Memòries Sweet Rancio 2019, 375ml, 16% - Costers del Priorat

$68.00
Sale price

Regular price $68.00

Winemaking

Memòries blends sweet and rancio wines.  The sweet part comes from sun-exposed Garnacha Blanca grapes. Once the grapes are dehydrated as desired, they are gently pressed. The must is fermented naturally and fermentation comes to a stop on its own.  The resulting sweet wine is blended with rancio (20%) from a 1927 solera in a barrel of the latter wine.

Tasting notes

Powerful, classical aromas. Honey notes. Saline, smoky, ancient nuances. The magic of time, the nerve of sweet fruits, the sunshine and the cool nooks and crannies of a big house in the country.  A smooth, gentle start that becomes deep and very long. Candied notes, almonds, ripe dry figs, coffee and chocolate. Length, charm and warmth. A wine that inspires calm, meditation and emotion.

Food harmonies

Memòries is the ideal wine to pair with pastries, specially those with chocolate and nuts. It is also a great accompaniment for traditional sweets: pastissets, carquinyolis, doughnuts, nougat, cakes… The best time to enjoy it is after a long, leisurely meal but it’s also a top choice as an aperitif —its power combined with the sweet flavours create a pleasant contrast with delicacies such as salted meat or fish and fried almonds with coarse salt..

In the vineyard

Varietes: 100% Garnacha.

Density of plants: From 3,000 to 3,500 vines per hectare.

Training techniques: Traditional Gobelet system.

Average rain: 350-500 mm.

Sun exposure: 2,800-3,000 hours per year.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Costers del Priorat

Costers del Priorat are one of the new-wave producers of the Priorat region which are helping to give this fantastic region in the northeast of Spain a new life and really bring modern techniques to these wines. Costers del Priorat are one of the few producers in this region whom are producing single vineyard wines all of which are fantastic!

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Grenache Blanc/Garnacha Blanca

Grenache Blanc is the white counterpart to the better-known: Grenache. Just as Grenache is also known as Garnacha, this is also known as Garnacha Blanca. Historically it is best known as one of the under-rated Rhone Valley white grapes that can be used in the white blends of the Southern Rhone.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Priorat

Priorat is one of the most important wine regions in all of Spain. It is in the heart of the Penedes up in the northwest of Spain and is red wine dominate. Here the grapes are Grenache (known locally as Garnacha) and Carignan, usually as a blend. The resulting wines are rich and dark.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Winemaking

Memòries blends sweet and rancio wines.  The sweet part comes from sun-exposed Garnacha Blanca grapes. Once the grapes are dehydrated as desired, they are gently pressed. The must is fermented naturally and fermentation comes to a stop on its own.  The resulting sweet wine is blended with rancio (20%) from a 1927 solera in a barrel of the latter wine.

Tasting notes

Powerful, classical aromas. Honey notes. Saline, smoky, ancient nuances. The magic of time, the nerve of sweet fruits, the sunshine and the cool nooks and crannies of a big house in the country.  A smooth, gentle start that becomes deep and very long. Candied notes, almonds, ripe dry figs, coffee and chocolate. Length, charm and warmth. A wine that inspires calm, meditation and emotion.

Food harmonies

Memòries is the ideal wine to pair with pastries, specially those with chocolate and nuts. It is also a great accompaniment for traditional sweets: pastissets, carquinyolis, doughnuts, nougat, cakes… The best time to enjoy it is after a long, leisurely meal but it’s also a top choice as an aperitif —its power combined with the sweet flavours create a pleasant contrast with delicacies such as salted meat or fish and fried almonds with coarse salt..

In the vineyard

Varietes: 100% Garnacha.

Density of plants: From 3,000 to 3,500 vines per hectare.

Training techniques: Traditional Gobelet system.

Average rain: 350-500 mm.

Sun exposure: 2,800-3,000 hours per year.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Costers del Priorat

Costers del Priorat are one of the new-wave producers of the Priorat region which are helping to give this fantastic region in the northeast of Spain a new life and really bring modern techniques to these wines. Costers del Priorat are one of the few producers in this region whom are producing single vineyard wines all of which are fantastic!

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Grenache Blanc/Garnacha Blanca

Grenache Blanc is the white counterpart to the better-known: Grenache. Just as Grenache is also known as Garnacha, this is also known as Garnacha Blanca. Historically it is best known as one of the under-rated Rhone Valley white grapes that can be used in the white blends of the Southern Rhone.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Priorat

Priorat is one of the most important wine regions in all of Spain. It is in the heart of the Penedes up in the northwest of Spain and is red wine dominate. Here the grapes are Grenache (known locally as Garnacha) and Carignan, usually as a blend. The resulting wines are rich and dark.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.