Obsidian Reserve The Mayor 2019

$68.00
Sale price

Regular price $68.00

Appearance

Dark ruby.

Bouquet

Black raspberry, violets, red liquorice.

Palate

The palate is rich and well-structured with beautiful texture and supple ripe tannins. This wine is elegant and refined with a restrained power that will benefit from careful cellaring for many years.

Cellaring

Drink now or suitable for cellaring up to 10 years.

 

The Producer

Obsidian Vineyard nestles in the coastal hills of the Onetangi Valley adjacent to the northern coast of Waiheke Island. Here, small batches of wine are grown on four discrete hillsides set out in an amphitheatre-like fashion. The sheltered vines enjoy high levels of heat summation, tempered by the maritime breeze. The mineralized clay soil is rich in iron and manganese oxides, and overlays ancient weathered rock. These conditions perfectly suit the noble red and white grapes originating from the Mediterranean countries.

The vineyard was originally planted in 1993 with the single objective of producing a great Bordeaux-style red. Since then the 10-hectare of planted vines, with its four distinctive blocks, has seen many changes with new varieties planted and although producing a stylish Bordeaux-style red remains a significant focus at Obsidian, other new and innovative grape varieties have been introduced.

Up until 2000 the only wine produced by Obsidian was a Bordeaux-style red. In 2000 a second label or “little brother” to Obsidian was introduced called Weeping Sands. It wasn’t until 2004 that Obsidian produced its first non Cabernet Blend wine – a delightful summer Rose made from merlot grapes. Since then, new single vineyard wines include Syrah, Montepulciano, Viognier, Chardonnay and Tempranillo have been planted. They are small in quantity but high in quality. Obsidian is the first vineyard on Waiheke Island to produce a Montepulciano and Tempranillo. In 2012/13 the Weeping Sands brand name was replaced with Obsidian non reserve label, simplifying the overall brand. Our decision to change was not made lightly, but it helps the winery focus on its core brand name, and simplifies promotion and marketing. The company has registered and will retain exclusive use of its alternate brand names including Weeping Sands, Black Glass and Yellow Clay Road for other potential applications. The traditional - existing Obsidian label will now become Obsidian Reserve, to include a series of five wines: "The Obsidian", "The Mayor", Syrah, Chardonnay and Viognier. Design changes are evolutionary and the new labels will be recognisable as Obsidian when seen alongside the old labels.

Our approach to viticulture and winemaking is uncomplicated. We strive to grow consistently ripe, concentrated, flavourful grapes and to craft them into superb wines for drinking and cellaring. Yields are kept deliberately low to maximise quality. As a result only a limited number of cases of Obsidian are produced each year, though this varies naturally with the vintage conditions. The combined annual production of Obsidian and Weeping Sands is typically about 4000 cases.

Our Vision 

  • Family of classic red and white varieties originating from the Mediterranean countries.
  • Single vineyard production of innovative varieties.
  • To make wines exhibiting technical qualities, balance and vibrancy which will cellar with promise and are vinified first and foremost to match well with food.
  • We are a dedicated team of wine enthusiasts whose passion and purpose is to create great wines and achieve recognition as a leader from “The Island of Wine”

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Appearance

Dark ruby.

Bouquet

Black raspberry, violets, red liquorice.

Palate

The palate is rich and well-structured with beautiful texture and supple ripe tannins. This wine is elegant and refined with a restrained power that will benefit from careful cellaring for many years.

Cellaring

Drink now or suitable for cellaring up to 10 years.

 

The Producer

Obsidian Vineyard nestles in the coastal hills of the Onetangi Valley adjacent to the northern coast of Waiheke Island. Here, small batches of wine are grown on four discrete hillsides set out in an amphitheatre-like fashion. The sheltered vines enjoy high levels of heat summation, tempered by the maritime breeze. The mineralized clay soil is rich in iron and manganese oxides, and overlays ancient weathered rock. These conditions perfectly suit the noble red and white grapes originating from the Mediterranean countries.

The vineyard was originally planted in 1993 with the single objective of producing a great Bordeaux-style red. Since then the 10-hectare of planted vines, with its four distinctive blocks, has seen many changes with new varieties planted and although producing a stylish Bordeaux-style red remains a significant focus at Obsidian, other new and innovative grape varieties have been introduced.

Up until 2000 the only wine produced by Obsidian was a Bordeaux-style red. In 2000 a second label or “little brother” to Obsidian was introduced called Weeping Sands. It wasn’t until 2004 that Obsidian produced its first non Cabernet Blend wine – a delightful summer Rose made from merlot grapes. Since then, new single vineyard wines include Syrah, Montepulciano, Viognier, Chardonnay and Tempranillo have been planted. They are small in quantity but high in quality. Obsidian is the first vineyard on Waiheke Island to produce a Montepulciano and Tempranillo. In 2012/13 the Weeping Sands brand name was replaced with Obsidian non reserve label, simplifying the overall brand. Our decision to change was not made lightly, but it helps the winery focus on its core brand name, and simplifies promotion and marketing. The company has registered and will retain exclusive use of its alternate brand names including Weeping Sands, Black Glass and Yellow Clay Road for other potential applications. The traditional - existing Obsidian label will now become Obsidian Reserve, to include a series of five wines: "The Obsidian", "The Mayor", Syrah, Chardonnay and Viognier. Design changes are evolutionary and the new labels will be recognisable as Obsidian when seen alongside the old labels.

Our approach to viticulture and winemaking is uncomplicated. We strive to grow consistently ripe, concentrated, flavourful grapes and to craft them into superb wines for drinking and cellaring. Yields are kept deliberately low to maximise quality. As a result only a limited number of cases of Obsidian are produced each year, though this varies naturally with the vintage conditions. The combined annual production of Obsidian and Weeping Sands is typically about 4000 cases.

Our Vision 

  • Family of classic red and white varieties originating from the Mediterranean countries.
  • Single vineyard production of innovative varieties.
  • To make wines exhibiting technical qualities, balance and vibrancy which will cellar with promise and are vinified first and foremost to match well with food.
  • We are a dedicated team of wine enthusiasts whose passion and purpose is to create great wines and achieve recognition as a leader from “The Island of Wine”

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.