Padro i Familia - 'Blanco Reserva' Vermouth

$48.00
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Regular price $48.00

Nose: Aromatically intense and very pleasant. Memories of sweet herbs such as star anise, lemon verbena, quina and angelica. Both well-balanced and complex.

Mouth: An elegant, smooth, refined and well-rounded palate with a slight sweetness, and also a certain bitterness. An elegant and citrus fruit finish ensures freshness and a superb aftertaste giving this vermouth a gourmet touch.

Vermouth made from a unique infusion of aromatic herbs and aged in the barrel before bottling at our winery.

This vermouth was inspired by our desire to make a vermouth enhanced with the Mediterranean citrus aromas that are so intrinsic to the area around our winery.

VINIFICATION
We blend an infusion of aromatic herbs with the peel of several different citrus fruits. After several months of maceration, we add an aged white mistela (sweet wine) that we keep especially for this vermouth.

PADRÓ & CO.

The wine-making origins of the Padró family date back to the year 1886 and to the village of Bràfim (Tarragona), which was, at the time a busy agricultural hub with around 400 inhabitants.

The very first sales were of wines and liqueur wines loaded onto carts in large but basic barrels and sold directly from there by the first generation of wine-making Padros: Daniel Padró Porta (1846-1890) and his wife Rosa Valldosera. At the time, they ran a fairly humble establishment with just one press and a small amount of distillery equipment for making spirits and anise liqueurs.

The second generation Daniel (1875-1953) and Juan (1878-1966) Padró Valldosera, joined the business at a young age, in the absence of their father and it was these two brothers who gave PADRO’s industrial activity a real entrepreneurial push. They moved the distillery to larger premises – at the current site of the winery and in 1916, built the first the three main buildings that make up Padró & Co. today, adding a further warehouse in 1932.

The third generation, the children of these two brothers, Daniel Padró Armengol (1914-2013) and Francisco Padró Busquets (1906-1993), decided to discontinue production of vermouths and other spirits in order to focus on the production of wines and a range of dry and sweet liqueurs.

All wines produced were sold in bulk form until 1960, when the fourth generation, Francisco (1934), Daniel (1936-2008) and Jose María (1943) Padro Armengol began bottling some of their production in glass and also in wooden boxes for the cooperative stores of large companies existing at the time.

The fifth generation, currently in charge of the winery, are following the same philosophy as their ancestors and producing quality bulk and bottled wine, liqueur wines and vermouths and have taken care to make sure their company keeps up with the times as regards modern wine-making processes and technology (tangential filtration, continuous tartaric stabilization and so on…) at their bottling plant as well as extending the Padró family vineyards and implementing a new grape reception and wine storage facility.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Nose: Aromatically intense and very pleasant. Memories of sweet herbs such as star anise, lemon verbena, quina and angelica. Both well-balanced and complex.

Mouth: An elegant, smooth, refined and well-rounded palate with a slight sweetness, and also a certain bitterness. An elegant and citrus fruit finish ensures freshness and a superb aftertaste giving this vermouth a gourmet touch.

Vermouth made from a unique infusion of aromatic herbs and aged in the barrel before bottling at our winery.

This vermouth was inspired by our desire to make a vermouth enhanced with the Mediterranean citrus aromas that are so intrinsic to the area around our winery.

VINIFICATION
We blend an infusion of aromatic herbs with the peel of several different citrus fruits. After several months of maceration, we add an aged white mistela (sweet wine) that we keep especially for this vermouth.

PADRÓ & CO.

The wine-making origins of the Padró family date back to the year 1886 and to the village of Bràfim (Tarragona), which was, at the time a busy agricultural hub with around 400 inhabitants.

The very first sales were of wines and liqueur wines loaded onto carts in large but basic barrels and sold directly from there by the first generation of wine-making Padros: Daniel Padró Porta (1846-1890) and his wife Rosa Valldosera. At the time, they ran a fairly humble establishment with just one press and a small amount of distillery equipment for making spirits and anise liqueurs.

The second generation Daniel (1875-1953) and Juan (1878-1966) Padró Valldosera, joined the business at a young age, in the absence of their father and it was these two brothers who gave PADRO’s industrial activity a real entrepreneurial push. They moved the distillery to larger premises – at the current site of the winery and in 1916, built the first the three main buildings that make up Padró & Co. today, adding a further warehouse in 1932.

The third generation, the children of these two brothers, Daniel Padró Armengol (1914-2013) and Francisco Padró Busquets (1906-1993), decided to discontinue production of vermouths and other spirits in order to focus on the production of wines and a range of dry and sweet liqueurs.

All wines produced were sold in bulk form until 1960, when the fourth generation, Francisco (1934), Daniel (1936-2008) and Jose María (1943) Padro Armengol began bottling some of their production in glass and also in wooden boxes for the cooperative stores of large companies existing at the time.

The fifth generation, currently in charge of the winery, are following the same philosophy as their ancestors and producing quality bulk and bottled wine, liqueur wines and vermouths and have taken care to make sure their company keeps up with the times as regards modern wine-making processes and technology (tangential filtration, continuous tartaric stabilization and so on…) at their bottling plant as well as extending the Padró family vineyards and implementing a new grape reception and wine storage facility.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

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03/03/2021
Anonymous
New Zealand New Zealand
I recommend this product
Just love it!

This is sublime. The best summer drink over lots of ice. Went way too fast. Always buy two bottles.