Petit Cantenac 2018

$75.00
Sale price

Regular price $75.00

This wine shows a medium dark red in colour and is marked by its’ beautiful and intense Cabernet character, with fresh and lush rich notes of black plums and rich notes of black figs, raspberries, figs and fine leather, with hints of ginger and spice and soft vanillary new oak.

On the palate it is full bodied with firm but carefully weighted tannins on the entry, which become more defined as the wine lingers in the mouth, with dense savoury and earthy characters leading towards a supple, blackberry and plum finish that displays good restraint and poise.

It is a delicious and pleasing wine with a firm satisfying freshness, quite forward in style, but with fine soft tannins and an easy aromatic evolution that spreads neatly right across the palate. It will drink well after only 2 or 3 years, but will also continue to develop nicely in the bottle.

Drink 2020 to 2028.

The Producer

Clos Cantenac is a small but seductive 6 hectares property made up of four main parcels of vines carefully planted on an exceptional “terroir” of deep gravels, sand and clay over broken limestone situated close to the prehistoric “Megalith ?de Pierrefitte”.

When we purchased this enchanting St Emilion Grand Cru Property in late 2006, the initial challenge was to take control of the day-to-day management of the vines, then to improve the vineyard architecture, and finally to renovate the ancient 200 year old winery in preparation for our first harvest in late September 2007.

In 2017 Charlotte Krajewski joined the team as Technical Director and Chief Wine Maker after having spent the previous ten years working overseas in six countries and on four continents.

Charlotte brings with her much accumulated knowledge and experience from around the world, yet we still continue to work in a very traditional way and proudly respect both the history and culture of the region in order to produce our fine wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

This wine shows a medium dark red in colour and is marked by its’ beautiful and intense Cabernet character, with fresh and lush rich notes of black plums and rich notes of black figs, raspberries, figs and fine leather, with hints of ginger and spice and soft vanillary new oak.

On the palate it is full bodied with firm but carefully weighted tannins on the entry, which become more defined as the wine lingers in the mouth, with dense savoury and earthy characters leading towards a supple, blackberry and plum finish that displays good restraint and poise.

It is a delicious and pleasing wine with a firm satisfying freshness, quite forward in style, but with fine soft tannins and an easy aromatic evolution that spreads neatly right across the palate. It will drink well after only 2 or 3 years, but will also continue to develop nicely in the bottle.

Drink 2020 to 2028.

The Producer

Clos Cantenac is a small but seductive 6 hectares property made up of four main parcels of vines carefully planted on an exceptional “terroir” of deep gravels, sand and clay over broken limestone situated close to the prehistoric “Megalith ?de Pierrefitte”.

When we purchased this enchanting St Emilion Grand Cru Property in late 2006, the initial challenge was to take control of the day-to-day management of the vines, then to improve the vineyard architecture, and finally to renovate the ancient 200 year old winery in preparation for our first harvest in late September 2007.

In 2017 Charlotte Krajewski joined the team as Technical Director and Chief Wine Maker after having spent the previous ten years working overseas in six countries and on four continents.

Charlotte brings with her much accumulated knowledge and experience from around the world, yet we still continue to work in a very traditional way and proudly respect both the history and culture of the region in order to produce our fine wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.