Petrakopoulos Gold Zakynthino 2019

$53.00
Sale price

Regular price $53.00

It has pale golden color, just as its name suggests. Aromas of kumquat, lime peel, pear, green apple, juicy lemon and notes of honeysuckle, toast and wet stone compose an enjoyable ensemble. Expressive mouth with medium body and refreshing, lemony acidity.

The Producer

The house in Thiramonas, which now accommodates our small winery, was once the Solomos family’s farmhouse. The family had always used the ground floor as a cellar for the production and storage of wine, which it had been bottling for its own use since the 1950s. The house collapsed with the devastating earthquake of 1953 and was completely rebuilt in 1955, using stone and following the old, minimal and noble architecture of the Venetian era. The arcs, large windows and stone-built steps are distinctive elements of this rhythm, while the “goulostroto” (cobblestone) in the main courtyard from the 1800s, as well as certain pieces of the furniture – heirlooms from the 1700s, have been preserved. The building is surrounded by a 1,500 m2 yard which encompasses a substantial orchard and other age-old trees. The courtyard, laid out with dry-stone walls and stone-built terraces on multiple levels, forms an ideal environment for our visitors’ wine tasting. It also includes two old cisterns, along with remnants of the family’s stone-built oil mill. The building’s ground floor now houses the vinification and aging areas, while the second floor comprises the family’s summer residence. To meet our modern needs, we have expanded into another two neighboring houses. Tzogia’s home, a typical auxiliary building, and Giannis’ home, with the huge, centuries-old olive tree in its yard. Both were built after the ‘53 earthquake for the immediate housing needs of the island’s populace.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

It has pale golden color, just as its name suggests. Aromas of kumquat, lime peel, pear, green apple, juicy lemon and notes of honeysuckle, toast and wet stone compose an enjoyable ensemble. Expressive mouth with medium body and refreshing, lemony acidity.

The Producer

The house in Thiramonas, which now accommodates our small winery, was once the Solomos family’s farmhouse. The family had always used the ground floor as a cellar for the production and storage of wine, which it had been bottling for its own use since the 1950s. The house collapsed with the devastating earthquake of 1953 and was completely rebuilt in 1955, using stone and following the old, minimal and noble architecture of the Venetian era. The arcs, large windows and stone-built steps are distinctive elements of this rhythm, while the “goulostroto” (cobblestone) in the main courtyard from the 1800s, as well as certain pieces of the furniture – heirlooms from the 1700s, have been preserved. The building is surrounded by a 1,500 m2 yard which encompasses a substantial orchard and other age-old trees. The courtyard, laid out with dry-stone walls and stone-built terraces on multiple levels, forms an ideal environment for our visitors’ wine tasting. It also includes two old cisterns, along with remnants of the family’s stone-built oil mill. The building’s ground floor now houses the vinification and aging areas, while the second floor comprises the family’s summer residence. To meet our modern needs, we have expanded into another two neighboring houses. Tzogia’s home, a typical auxiliary building, and Giannis’ home, with the huge, centuries-old olive tree in its yard. Both were built after the ‘53 earthquake for the immediate housing needs of the island’s populace.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.