Pieropan - 'La Rocca' Soave Classico 2017

$58.00
Sale price

Regular price $58.00

"GOLD MEDAL AND TROPHY IWSC LONDON 5 years running. Single vineyard 200- 300 metres above sea level on Monte Rocchetta. After fermentation the wine is racked into large old barrels and left on lees for 12 months. The result is a rich complex Soave, with hints of exotic fruit and nuts on the nose, a soft yet full palate of spice and vanilla."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Pieropan

Nino Pieropan and his wife Teresita have a commitment to terroir and tradition, and have worked hard with their research on different clones, safeguarding near extinct varieties. In the vineyard (they have 30 ha of vines overall) they practice short pruning, green harvesting and organic manuring in their quest for quality. The wines aren’t showy but display real class and concentration – they are whites that I really enjoy.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Garganega

Garganega is a variety of white Italian wine grape widely grown in the Veneto region of North East Italy, particularly in the provinces of Verona and Vicenza. It is Italy's 6th most widely planted white grape.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Veneto

The Veneto wine region is located in the north-east of Italy - protected from the harsh northern European climate by the Alps (Dolomites), the foothills of which form the Veneto's northern boundary. These cooler conditions are well-suited to white varietals like Garganega (the main grape in Soave wines). While the warmer Adriatic coastal plains and river valleys are where the renowned Valpolicella, Bardolino and Amarone DOC reds are produced - and is believed to have cultivated grapes since the Bronze Age. 
Veneto's grape growers are among the most modernised in Italy - and one of the foremost wine producing regions, both for quality and quantity. While most of the 'classic' wines from this area are based on native varietals like Glera (formerly known as Prosecco) and Verduzzo. High demand for Veneto wines in international markets has encouraged the region to experiment with Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay and Pinot varietals.

Veneto has over 90,000 hectares of vineyards, of which 35,400 are acclaimed DOC, making it the biggest DOC producer in Italy. A highly productive Italian region known for producing more white than red wines, with white wine accounting for 75% of the DOC production in Veneto. The climate changes significantly - with continental aspects on the plains, and mild conditions along the Adriatic coast, around Lake Garda and in the hill areas.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"GOLD MEDAL AND TROPHY IWSC LONDON 5 years running. Single vineyard 200- 300 metres above sea level on Monte Rocchetta. After fermentation the wine is racked into large old barrels and left on lees for 12 months. The result is a rich complex Soave, with hints of exotic fruit and nuts on the nose, a soft yet full palate of spice and vanilla."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Pieropan

Nino Pieropan and his wife Teresita have a commitment to terroir and tradition, and have worked hard with their research on different clones, safeguarding near extinct varieties. In the vineyard (they have 30 ha of vines overall) they practice short pruning, green harvesting and organic manuring in their quest for quality. The wines aren’t showy but display real class and concentration – they are whites that I really enjoy.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Garganega

Garganega is a variety of white Italian wine grape widely grown in the Veneto region of North East Italy, particularly in the provinces of Verona and Vicenza. It is Italy's 6th most widely planted white grape.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Veneto

The Veneto wine region is located in the north-east of Italy - protected from the harsh northern European climate by the Alps (Dolomites), the foothills of which form the Veneto's northern boundary. These cooler conditions are well-suited to white varietals like Garganega (the main grape in Soave wines). While the warmer Adriatic coastal plains and river valleys are where the renowned Valpolicella, Bardolino and Amarone DOC reds are produced - and is believed to have cultivated grapes since the Bronze Age. 
Veneto's grape growers are among the most modernised in Italy - and one of the foremost wine producing regions, both for quality and quantity. While most of the 'classic' wines from this area are based on native varietals like Glera (formerly known as Prosecco) and Verduzzo. High demand for Veneto wines in international markets has encouraged the region to experiment with Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay and Pinot varietals.

Veneto has over 90,000 hectares of vineyards, of which 35,400 are acclaimed DOC, making it the biggest DOC producer in Italy. A highly productive Italian region known for producing more white than red wines, with white wine accounting for 75% of the DOC production in Veneto. The climate changes significantly - with continental aspects on the plains, and mild conditions along the Adriatic coast, around Lake Garda and in the hill areas.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.