Pintia 2015

$130.00
Sale price

Regular price $130.00

PARKER (94)

The only wine produced here is the 2015 Pintia, which, in the warm and dry 2015, reaches 15% alcohol and has moderate acidity and a creamy, soft texture, with plenty of concentration, ripeness and tannins. It fermented in oak vats and matured in oak barrels (new and used, French and American) for 12 months. It was a powerful vintage, and they did part of the malolactic fermentation in oak vats instead of 100% in barrique to keep some of the freshness, and they also have 15,000 liters of wine that can mature in stainless steel and rotate some lots in vat before they are put in barrique. All this goes in the direction of keeping the freshness of the wine in a zone where power comes naturally, and all the tools are welcomed, including the use of different toast in the barrels. All this seems to have paid off, and even if the wine is powerful and tannic, it has good balance and the tannins are fine-grained. This has reached a good balance between power and elegance. 203,857 bottles, 6,496 magnums and some larger formats produced. It was bottled in May 2017.

The Producer

Pintia is the labour of love of the great Vega Sicilia. Not content with making Spain’s most famous fine wine in their home territory of Ribera del Duero, they’ve been tempted westward by the outstanding potential of sleepy Toro. A combination of ancient bush vines, year long sunlight and cooling, high altitude makes reds of astonishing darkness and richness. So much so that Columbus took them when he sailed to America – they were said to be the only wines that could survive the trip. Pintia is made purely from Tinto del Toro, harvested from vines over 40 years old. Grapes go through two selections – in the vineyard and the winery – with ageing for a year in mostly French oak, new and seasoned. Dense, rich yet with freshness and balance.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

PARKER (94)

The only wine produced here is the 2015 Pintia, which, in the warm and dry 2015, reaches 15% alcohol and has moderate acidity and a creamy, soft texture, with plenty of concentration, ripeness and tannins. It fermented in oak vats and matured in oak barrels (new and used, French and American) for 12 months. It was a powerful vintage, and they did part of the malolactic fermentation in oak vats instead of 100% in barrique to keep some of the freshness, and they also have 15,000 liters of wine that can mature in stainless steel and rotate some lots in vat before they are put in barrique. All this goes in the direction of keeping the freshness of the wine in a zone where power comes naturally, and all the tools are welcomed, including the use of different toast in the barrels. All this seems to have paid off, and even if the wine is powerful and tannic, it has good balance and the tannins are fine-grained. This has reached a good balance between power and elegance. 203,857 bottles, 6,496 magnums and some larger formats produced. It was bottled in May 2017.

The Producer

Pintia is the labour of love of the great Vega Sicilia. Not content with making Spain’s most famous fine wine in their home territory of Ribera del Duero, they’ve been tempted westward by the outstanding potential of sleepy Toro. A combination of ancient bush vines, year long sunlight and cooling, high altitude makes reds of astonishing darkness and richness. So much so that Columbus took them when he sailed to America – they were said to be the only wines that could survive the trip. Pintia is made purely from Tinto del Toro, harvested from vines over 40 years old. Grapes go through two selections – in the vineyard and the winery – with ageing for a year in mostly French oak, new and seasoned. Dense, rich yet with freshness and balance.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.