Rebholz Muschelkalk Weisser Burgunder Trocken 2016

$60.00
Sale price

Regular price $60.00

" This is effectively the younger-vines second wine to Rebholz’s Im Sonnenschein Grosses Gewächs. A head-turning nose features Pinot Blanc-typical apple and almond in fresh and high-toned distilled form laced with bittersweet floral essences. A delightful counterpoint of both flavors and textures is set up by almond cream, fresh apple, chalk impingements and piquant, lightly sizzling corn shoot. The underlying mid palate texture is flatteringly silken, while the lusciously lingering finish at once soothes, invigorates and delivers significant mineral intrigue."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Rebholz

The Rebholz estate, in the southern Pfalz region of Germany, is a pioneer in organic and natural winemaking. The estate has been certified organic since 2005 and practicing biodynamics since 2006. However, even as far back as 1951, Eduard Rebholz (1889-1966), who received the title Ökonomierat, an honorary title conferred upon a deserving agriculturist, commented on his natural approach: "You will receive only natural wine from my cellar, wine that is the result of intense and loving cultivation of the vines and of similar vinicultural methods (no chaptalization, no artificial addition of a Süßreserve or similar fundamental structural changes that alter the native character of the wine and, in my eyes, mean that it is no longer a natural product."  

This tradition continues with the current generation; Birgit and Hansjörg Rebholz together with their children Hans, Valentin and Helene work as close to nature as possible. In an effort to promote a healthy ecosystem and to protect the environment, they forgo the use of herbicides, synthetic fungicides and mineral fertilizers. They use only organic and biodynamic techniques and materials that promote healthy plants, helping the vines grow strong and prosper naturally. While these methods involve more time and effort, it is a price they are willing to accept in order to best protect and preserve the biodiversity within their vineyards

The earliest recorded history of wine growing by the Rebholz family in Siebeldingen dates back to 1632. From beer brewer to village mayor, family members have held a wide range of titles over the years. The single constant: always at least one winemaker in the family. Around 100 years ago the Rebholz clan took the estate house, first built in the 16th century, as their family home. The Rebholz family only began bottling their wine following the Second World War, as an alternative to delivering entire barrels to local inns and restaurants

The role of soil in producing quality wine is so crucial that they have spent many lifetimes searching out the finest sites and then preserving and protecting them through organic farming practices. All fruit is picked by hand, in many cases long after their esteemed neighbours have completed their own harvest. 

The Rebholz family believe that this work directly impacts the quality of their wines. Each terroir is defined by its own distinct native flora and fauna, the living organisms in the soil, the natural topsoil and a certain capacity on the part of the vines and their roots to tap into and work with these elements. By nurturing a more natural ecosystem in the soil, they help the vines better express the distinct character of their terroir in their fruit, and thus ultimately in the wines. Then as now, Rebholz wines are neither enriched nor de-acidified. They believe both practices spoil the wine's defining and natural character.

Rebholz wines conform to the published standards of the EU Eco Regulation and have earned EU organic certification.

There are three distinct terroirs in the estate’s vineyards. In the “South-Pfalz”, where the estate is located, limestone terroir rules and it is ubiquitously present in one part of the Im Sonnenschein vineyard where Riesling, Pinot Noir, Pinot Blanc and to lesser amounts Pinot Gris, Gewürztraminer and Muskateller are planted. In the Ganzhorn, a small parcel of the same site, the estate's Riesling excels. It performs the minor miracle of exquisite peach, apple and apricot aromas sourced from colorful sandstone.  Last but not least there is the Kastanienbusch with its rocky, rusty-red soil of the true primary rock from the lower strata of the “new” red sandstone. It simply produces some of the greatest dry Rieslings not only in Germany – but anywhere.

The estate’s 22 ha are farmed biodynamically with a production of about 10,000 cases. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Weissburgunder/Pinot Blanc

When standing on its own two feet (rather than being blended away into other whites), Pinot Blanc is brashly aromatic and fruit-driven. Although most Pinot Blanc comes from northern Italy and Germany’s Alsace region and is blessed with old-soil flavour depth, New Zealand growers are claiming intense flavour characteristics with young vines and have understandably high hopes for the future. Originally a genetic mutation of Pinot Noir, Pinot Blanc is most similar to Chardonnay when barrel fermented but exhibits greater subtlety and understatement than its more famous counterpart, boasting wonderful textural richness.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Palatinate/Pfalz

The Palatinate (in German, Pfalz) region ranks alongside the Mosel as the largest producing region of Riesling in the world with around 5,000 hectares devoted to the grape. It is also the biggest red wine region in Germany with 40% of the vineyards planted to red grapes.

3,000 wine-growing families tend to the vineyards. Half of the family-run vineyards produce their own wines and sell them directly, meaning that there is no end to opportunities for a wine-tasting session in the Palatinate region. 

The best way to explore the Palatinate wine-growing region is along the German Wine Route, the oldest tourist-orientated wine route of its kind in the whole world. Cycle paths and hiking trails along the way provide the perfect chance to explore the wine region between the Palatinate Forest and the Rhine on foot or on a bike.

Main grape varieties: Riesling, Müller-Thurgau, Kerner, Silvaner, Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

" This is effectively the younger-vines second wine to Rebholz’s Im Sonnenschein Grosses Gewächs. A head-turning nose features Pinot Blanc-typical apple and almond in fresh and high-toned distilled form laced with bittersweet floral essences. A delightful counterpoint of both flavors and textures is set up by almond cream, fresh apple, chalk impingements and piquant, lightly sizzling corn shoot. The underlying mid palate texture is flatteringly silken, while the lusciously lingering finish at once soothes, invigorates and delivers significant mineral intrigue."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Rebholz

The Rebholz estate, in the southern Pfalz region of Germany, is a pioneer in organic and natural winemaking. The estate has been certified organic since 2005 and practicing biodynamics since 2006. However, even as far back as 1951, Eduard Rebholz (1889-1966), who received the title Ökonomierat, an honorary title conferred upon a deserving agriculturist, commented on his natural approach: "You will receive only natural wine from my cellar, wine that is the result of intense and loving cultivation of the vines and of similar vinicultural methods (no chaptalization, no artificial addition of a Süßreserve or similar fundamental structural changes that alter the native character of the wine and, in my eyes, mean that it is no longer a natural product."  

This tradition continues with the current generation; Birgit and Hansjörg Rebholz together with their children Hans, Valentin and Helene work as close to nature as possible. In an effort to promote a healthy ecosystem and to protect the environment, they forgo the use of herbicides, synthetic fungicides and mineral fertilizers. They use only organic and biodynamic techniques and materials that promote healthy plants, helping the vines grow strong and prosper naturally. While these methods involve more time and effort, it is a price they are willing to accept in order to best protect and preserve the biodiversity within their vineyards

The earliest recorded history of wine growing by the Rebholz family in Siebeldingen dates back to 1632. From beer brewer to village mayor, family members have held a wide range of titles over the years. The single constant: always at least one winemaker in the family. Around 100 years ago the Rebholz clan took the estate house, first built in the 16th century, as their family home. The Rebholz family only began bottling their wine following the Second World War, as an alternative to delivering entire barrels to local inns and restaurants

The role of soil in producing quality wine is so crucial that they have spent many lifetimes searching out the finest sites and then preserving and protecting them through organic farming practices. All fruit is picked by hand, in many cases long after their esteemed neighbours have completed their own harvest. 

The Rebholz family believe that this work directly impacts the quality of their wines. Each terroir is defined by its own distinct native flora and fauna, the living organisms in the soil, the natural topsoil and a certain capacity on the part of the vines and their roots to tap into and work with these elements. By nurturing a more natural ecosystem in the soil, they help the vines better express the distinct character of their terroir in their fruit, and thus ultimately in the wines. Then as now, Rebholz wines are neither enriched nor de-acidified. They believe both practices spoil the wine's defining and natural character.

Rebholz wines conform to the published standards of the EU Eco Regulation and have earned EU organic certification.

There are three distinct terroirs in the estate’s vineyards. In the “South-Pfalz”, where the estate is located, limestone terroir rules and it is ubiquitously present in one part of the Im Sonnenschein vineyard where Riesling, Pinot Noir, Pinot Blanc and to lesser amounts Pinot Gris, Gewürztraminer and Muskateller are planted. In the Ganzhorn, a small parcel of the same site, the estate's Riesling excels. It performs the minor miracle of exquisite peach, apple and apricot aromas sourced from colorful sandstone.  Last but not least there is the Kastanienbusch with its rocky, rusty-red soil of the true primary rock from the lower strata of the “new” red sandstone. It simply produces some of the greatest dry Rieslings not only in Germany – but anywhere.

The estate’s 22 ha are farmed biodynamically with a production of about 10,000 cases. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Weissburgunder/Pinot Blanc

When standing on its own two feet (rather than being blended away into other whites), Pinot Blanc is brashly aromatic and fruit-driven. Although most Pinot Blanc comes from northern Italy and Germany’s Alsace region and is blessed with old-soil flavour depth, New Zealand growers are claiming intense flavour characteristics with young vines and have understandably high hopes for the future. Originally a genetic mutation of Pinot Noir, Pinot Blanc is most similar to Chardonnay when barrel fermented but exhibits greater subtlety and understatement than its more famous counterpart, boasting wonderful textural richness.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Palatinate/Pfalz

The Palatinate (in German, Pfalz) region ranks alongside the Mosel as the largest producing region of Riesling in the world with around 5,000 hectares devoted to the grape. It is also the biggest red wine region in Germany with 40% of the vineyards planted to red grapes.

3,000 wine-growing families tend to the vineyards. Half of the family-run vineyards produce their own wines and sell them directly, meaning that there is no end to opportunities for a wine-tasting session in the Palatinate region. 

The best way to explore the Palatinate wine-growing region is along the German Wine Route, the oldest tourist-orientated wine route of its kind in the whole world. Cycle paths and hiking trails along the way provide the perfect chance to explore the wine region between the Palatinate Forest and the Rhine on foot or on a bike.

Main grape varieties: Riesling, Müller-Thurgau, Kerner, Silvaner, Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.