Redemption Bourbon

$75.00
Sale price

Regular price $75.00

A truly easy drinking whiskey distinguished by its subtle rye-forward flavor, our bourbon has a rye content of 21%, giving it a light but distinct hint of spice. Enjoy it on the rocks or mixed into your favorite bourbon cocktail.

Nose - Caramel with just a touch of spice and hints of over-ripe bananas

Palate - Toffee, kola nut, and baking spice dominate with nuanced anise and black pepper

Finish - Smooth with a sweet and spicy balance between corn and cracked pepper

The Producer

Redemption Whiskey, according to the lore spun up by its founders, “was created serendipitously when [Schmier and Kanbar] uncovered a cache of Rye Whiskey barrels they believed to be the perfect expression of this classic American spirit.” It is today made at the infamous MGP distillery in Indiana, but in what seems to be a nod to the fact coming more clean likely wins you more fans, Redemption at least mentions its whiskies are “distilled in Indiana and bottled in small batches in Bardstown, KY with each batch and bottle number hand written on every label.”

The whiskies under the Redemption label – particularly the special, limited edition rye offerings that are barrel proof and range in age from 6 to 10 years – have “garnered accolades in prestigious competitions including achieving Gold and Double Gold medals in the 2015 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.” The brand as a whole has also tripled in size in the last two years “despite demand consistently exceeding supply.”

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

A truly easy drinking whiskey distinguished by its subtle rye-forward flavor, our bourbon has a rye content of 21%, giving it a light but distinct hint of spice. Enjoy it on the rocks or mixed into your favorite bourbon cocktail.

Nose - Caramel with just a touch of spice and hints of over-ripe bananas

Palate - Toffee, kola nut, and baking spice dominate with nuanced anise and black pepper

Finish - Smooth with a sweet and spicy balance between corn and cracked pepper

The Producer

Redemption Whiskey, according to the lore spun up by its founders, “was created serendipitously when [Schmier and Kanbar] uncovered a cache of Rye Whiskey barrels they believed to be the perfect expression of this classic American spirit.” It is today made at the infamous MGP distillery in Indiana, but in what seems to be a nod to the fact coming more clean likely wins you more fans, Redemption at least mentions its whiskies are “distilled in Indiana and bottled in small batches in Bardstown, KY with each batch and bottle number hand written on every label.”

The whiskies under the Redemption label – particularly the special, limited edition rye offerings that are barrel proof and range in age from 6 to 10 years – have “garnered accolades in prestigious competitions including achieving Gold and Double Gold medals in the 2015 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.” The brand as a whole has also tripled in size in the last two years “despite demand consistently exceeding supply.”

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.