Remy Martin XO

$340.00
Sale price

Regular price $340.00

NOSE - Wide spectrum of aromas of late summer fruit, combined with rich floral notes of white flowers such as jasmine.

TASTE - The perfect expression of Fine Champagne opulence on the palate with mature flavors of juicy plums and candied oranges, with a hint of hazelnuts and cinnamon

BODY - Velvety, rich, and lingering.

The Producer
1724

Rémy Martin, a young winegrower in Cognac, begins selling cognac under his own name.

MAISON, TERROIR, FAMILY
1738

King Louis XV of France grants Rémy Martin the rare right to plant new vines in recognition of the excellence of his cognacs.

TERROIR, MAISON

1810
PAUL-ÉMILE RÉMY MARTIN

Paul-Emile Rémy Martin took the house and its cognacs beyond Europe into the United States, Asia, and the Pacific.

FAMILY
1830
THE FIRST RÉMY MARTIN GRANDE CHAMPAGNE COGNAC IS CREATED.
PRODUCTS, TERROIR
1870

To accompany the house’s development abroad, he chooses the Centaur as the emblem of the house, creating a logo for the first time. An avid astronomer, it was also his star sign, Sagittarius.

MAISON
1910

Goes into partnership with Paul-Émile Rémy Martin II and starts to develop the house’s full potential.

TERROIR, MAISON

1924
ANDRÉ RENAUD

In 1924 André Renaud becomes the first Cellar Master of the house, and later its chairman.

FAMILY
1927

Launches Rémy Martin Fine Champagne Cognac VSOP by blending Petite Champagne and Grande Champagne crus. It’s an immediate success based on its differentiating point: superior quality.

PRODUCTS, TERROIR
1938
FINE CHAMPAGNE COGNAC IS LEGALLY RECOGNIZED FOR ITS SUPERIOR QUALITY.
TERROIR

1960
ANDRÉ GIRAUD

Trained by André Renaud himself, André Giraud accelerates the use of modern technology in the cellars, creates the development center and the first cooperage at Merpins – all three very much at the heart of Rémy Martin today.

FAMILY

1965
ANDRÉ HÉRIARD DUBREUIL

As son-in-law to André Renaud, André Hériard Dubreuil takes the reins as president and launches a visionary partnership with winegrowers, today known as the Alliance Fine Champagne, to guarantee the highest quality.

FAMILY
1972

The now iconic black frosted VSOP bottle is devised.

PRODUCTS

1990
GEORGES CLOT

Georges Clot introduces modern digital techniques for managing the cellar stocks.

FAMILY

2003
PIERRETTE TRICHET

The first woman to be appointed Cellar Master to a major cognac house. She creates Centaure and Centaure de Diamant, and imparts the secrets of the Rémy Martin legacy on Baptiste Loiseau, just as Georges Clot has passed them on to her.

FAMILY

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

NOSE - Wide spectrum of aromas of late summer fruit, combined with rich floral notes of white flowers such as jasmine.

TASTE - The perfect expression of Fine Champagne opulence on the palate with mature flavors of juicy plums and candied oranges, with a hint of hazelnuts and cinnamon

BODY - Velvety, rich, and lingering.

The Producer
1724

Rémy Martin, a young winegrower in Cognac, begins selling cognac under his own name.

MAISON, TERROIR, FAMILY
1738

King Louis XV of France grants Rémy Martin the rare right to plant new vines in recognition of the excellence of his cognacs.

TERROIR, MAISON

1810
PAUL-ÉMILE RÉMY MARTIN

Paul-Emile Rémy Martin took the house and its cognacs beyond Europe into the United States, Asia, and the Pacific.

FAMILY
1830
THE FIRST RÉMY MARTIN GRANDE CHAMPAGNE COGNAC IS CREATED.
PRODUCTS, TERROIR
1870

To accompany the house’s development abroad, he chooses the Centaur as the emblem of the house, creating a logo for the first time. An avid astronomer, it was also his star sign, Sagittarius.

MAISON
1910

Goes into partnership with Paul-Émile Rémy Martin II and starts to develop the house’s full potential.

TERROIR, MAISON

1924
ANDRÉ RENAUD

In 1924 André Renaud becomes the first Cellar Master of the house, and later its chairman.

FAMILY
1927

Launches Rémy Martin Fine Champagne Cognac VSOP by blending Petite Champagne and Grande Champagne crus. It’s an immediate success based on its differentiating point: superior quality.

PRODUCTS, TERROIR
1938
FINE CHAMPAGNE COGNAC IS LEGALLY RECOGNIZED FOR ITS SUPERIOR QUALITY.
TERROIR

1960
ANDRÉ GIRAUD

Trained by André Renaud himself, André Giraud accelerates the use of modern technology in the cellars, creates the development center and the first cooperage at Merpins – all three very much at the heart of Rémy Martin today.

FAMILY

1965
ANDRÉ HÉRIARD DUBREUIL

As son-in-law to André Renaud, André Hériard Dubreuil takes the reins as president and launches a visionary partnership with winegrowers, today known as the Alliance Fine Champagne, to guarantee the highest quality.

FAMILY
1972

The now iconic black frosted VSOP bottle is devised.

PRODUCTS

1990
GEORGES CLOT

Georges Clot introduces modern digital techniques for managing the cellar stocks.

FAMILY

2003
PIERRETTE TRICHET

The first woman to be appointed Cellar Master to a major cognac house. She creates Centaure and Centaure de Diamant, and imparts the secrets of the Rémy Martin legacy on Baptiste Loiseau, just as Georges Clot has passed them on to her.

FAMILY

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.