Saorsa - Syrah 2019

$37.00
Sale price

Regular price $37.00

"Aromatic notes of rose petals and dried herbs layered upon liquorish, smoke and earth. Fresh and lively with a seductive silky finish. Our wines are produced with oxygen exposure and develop greatly once opened. Decanting the wines will allow them to truly express themselves."

VINEYARD Grown in the Hawke’s Bay subregion of Paki Paki. This idyllic hillside site has gentle North facing slopes with shallow limestone soils. A slightly more inland area of Hawke’s Bay with long hot days and an abundance of sunlight. This presence of light and heat combined with the natural slope of the site and the presence of limestone allows our Syrah to boast both masculine and delicate floral tones.

GROWING SEASON 2019 can only be described as idyllic. After the three previous harvests had been hit in various ways by tropical cyclones, 2019 was an absolute dream. Hawke’s Bay saw a reasonably warm winter season, which led to an early budburst in the vineyards. The growing season was warm and reasonably dry, with rain coming when needed, but leaving the season disease free. The 2019 harvest was early as the entire season had been. The summer and autumn period were long and dry, allowing us to pick when we wanted with no pressure from rain. 2019 saw perfect conditions across all varieties from early to late.

VINIFICATION Hand-harvested 11th April 2019 and transported to the winery where the fruit was transferred to the fermenter and gently foot crushed to allow for 100% whole bunch fermentation. A short cold soak period led to fermentation with indigenous yeast. Gentle pump overs were performed twice per day in the presence of oxygen. Fermentation lasted 18 days before being pressed. A short settling period before running the wine to neutral oak both traditional barrique and 500l puncheon where malo-lactic fermentation started in the following spring. Aged in oak for 13 months before a light filtration prior to bottling. Bottled without fining and only a small addition of sulphur. Bottled 7th July 2020.

Alcohol - 12.5%

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Saorsa

Saorsa is small, micro-small. We are family-owned and operated, with each Montaperto-Hendry chipping in to make it a success. Alex has worked in the vines and cellars since leaving school and moving to Hawke’s Bay where he met his wife Hana who is a trained stainless steel engineer.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah/Shiraz

Syrah and Shiraz are two different names for the same red wine grape (and wines made from that grape). “Syrah” is what it's called in France’s Rhône Valley, where it is the main red wine grape of the Northern Rhône and a blending grape in the Southern Rhône. “Shiraz” is what winemakers in Australia typically call it.

Over time, the use of Shiraz or Syrah has taken on more meaning, and producers might choose one name or the other to indicate the style of their wine. A winemaker might bottle a “Shiraz” to indicate they made a rich, lush, riper, more fruit-forward wine in the Australian spirit. Or they might instead call their wine “Syrah” to indicate a more Old World– or leaner style of wine. Unfortunately, these terms can be used inconsistently.

As far as the link to Persia, Shiraz is the name of the capital in the Fars province, and there’s evidence that the earliest wines were made in that part of the world. For a long time it was believed that cuttings from Persia made their way to France’s Rhône region, and Syrah might have hailed from Persia, but DNA testing proved that Syrah/Shiraz is indigenous to France.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Hawkes Bay

Sunny Hawkes Bay is along the eastern coast of New Zealand's north island. It is here where some of the most fruit-forward wines come from. They are known for their tropical Chardonnays and their juicy reds from the excellent Bordeaux wines to the peppery Syrahs. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Aromatic notes of rose petals and dried herbs layered upon liquorish, smoke and earth. Fresh and lively with a seductive silky finish. Our wines are produced with oxygen exposure and develop greatly once opened. Decanting the wines will allow them to truly express themselves."

VINEYARD Grown in the Hawke’s Bay subregion of Paki Paki. This idyllic hillside site has gentle North facing slopes with shallow limestone soils. A slightly more inland area of Hawke’s Bay with long hot days and an abundance of sunlight. This presence of light and heat combined with the natural slope of the site and the presence of limestone allows our Syrah to boast both masculine and delicate floral tones.

GROWING SEASON 2019 can only be described as idyllic. After the three previous harvests had been hit in various ways by tropical cyclones, 2019 was an absolute dream. Hawke’s Bay saw a reasonably warm winter season, which led to an early budburst in the vineyards. The growing season was warm and reasonably dry, with rain coming when needed, but leaving the season disease free. The 2019 harvest was early as the entire season had been. The summer and autumn period were long and dry, allowing us to pick when we wanted with no pressure from rain. 2019 saw perfect conditions across all varieties from early to late.

VINIFICATION Hand-harvested 11th April 2019 and transported to the winery where the fruit was transferred to the fermenter and gently foot crushed to allow for 100% whole bunch fermentation. A short cold soak period led to fermentation with indigenous yeast. Gentle pump overs were performed twice per day in the presence of oxygen. Fermentation lasted 18 days before being pressed. A short settling period before running the wine to neutral oak both traditional barrique and 500l puncheon where malo-lactic fermentation started in the following spring. Aged in oak for 13 months before a light filtration prior to bottling. Bottled without fining and only a small addition of sulphur. Bottled 7th July 2020.

Alcohol - 12.5%

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Saorsa

Saorsa is small, micro-small. We are family-owned and operated, with each Montaperto-Hendry chipping in to make it a success. Alex has worked in the vines and cellars since leaving school and moving to Hawke’s Bay where he met his wife Hana who is a trained stainless steel engineer.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah/Shiraz

Syrah and Shiraz are two different names for the same red wine grape (and wines made from that grape). “Syrah” is what it's called in France’s Rhône Valley, where it is the main red wine grape of the Northern Rhône and a blending grape in the Southern Rhône. “Shiraz” is what winemakers in Australia typically call it.

Over time, the use of Shiraz or Syrah has taken on more meaning, and producers might choose one name or the other to indicate the style of their wine. A winemaker might bottle a “Shiraz” to indicate they made a rich, lush, riper, more fruit-forward wine in the Australian spirit. Or they might instead call their wine “Syrah” to indicate a more Old World– or leaner style of wine. Unfortunately, these terms can be used inconsistently.

As far as the link to Persia, Shiraz is the name of the capital in the Fars province, and there’s evidence that the earliest wines were made in that part of the world. For a long time it was believed that cuttings from Persia made their way to France’s Rhône region, and Syrah might have hailed from Persia, but DNA testing proved that Syrah/Shiraz is indigenous to France.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Hawkes Bay

Sunny Hawkes Bay is along the eastern coast of New Zealand's north island. It is here where some of the most fruit-forward wines come from. They are known for their tropical Chardonnays and their juicy reds from the excellent Bordeaux wines to the peppery Syrahs. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.