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The Balvenie Peated Triple Cask 14 Years

$205.00
Sale price

Regular price $205.00

THE BALVENIE

PEATED TRIPLE CASK


AGED 14 YEARS

The Balvenie Peated Triple Cask Aged 14 Years is the result of trials undertaken in 2001 by The Balvenie Malt Master David C. Stewart MBE and our former distillery manager Ian Millar.

The trials were started at a time when few Scottish distilleries were producing any whisky at all due to a slowdown in the Scotch industry.  It was Ian’s drive to innovate and David’s need to create new flavours that lay the foundations for future whiskies with peated malt. Our peated whiskies are a testament to the freedom we enjoy as a family company and show The Balvenie in an unexpected way, but remain true to our distillery style.

The Balvenie Peated Triple Cask Aged 14 Years is non-chill filtered, bottled at 48.3% ABV and launched exclusively to travel retail in June 2017. The whisky is our first release made from 100% peated malt and was aged in three traditional cask types – first-fill bourbon, refill bourbon and sherry, resulting in exceptional smoky sweet notes with cinnamon and ginger spiciness.

TASTING NOTES


NOSE A malty sweetness on the nose complemented by gentle smoke in the background. Vanilla toffee gives way to a cinnamon spiciness.

TASTE Smoke comes to the fore followed up by syrupy sweetness, fresh citrus, creamy vanilla and honey, ending with a cinnamon and ginger spice.

FINISH Delicate smoke with a lingering and spicy sweetness.

The Producer

THE WILLIAM GRANT WAY


Thanks to natural alchemy and centuries-old craftsmanship, The Balvenie is unique among single malts. Our whisky-making process is dedicated to maintaining the Five Rare Crafts and we are the only distillery in Scotland that still grows its own barley, uses traditional floor maltings and keeps both a coppersmith and a team of coopers on site. And of course, our Malt Master David C. Stewart MBE presides over the all-important maturation process. Making The Balvenie the most hand-crafted of single malts.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

THE BALVENIE

PEATED TRIPLE CASK


AGED 14 YEARS

The Balvenie Peated Triple Cask Aged 14 Years is the result of trials undertaken in 2001 by The Balvenie Malt Master David C. Stewart MBE and our former distillery manager Ian Millar.

The trials were started at a time when few Scottish distilleries were producing any whisky at all due to a slowdown in the Scotch industry.  It was Ian’s drive to innovate and David’s need to create new flavours that lay the foundations for future whiskies with peated malt. Our peated whiskies are a testament to the freedom we enjoy as a family company and show The Balvenie in an unexpected way, but remain true to our distillery style.

The Balvenie Peated Triple Cask Aged 14 Years is non-chill filtered, bottled at 48.3% ABV and launched exclusively to travel retail in June 2017. The whisky is our first release made from 100% peated malt and was aged in three traditional cask types – first-fill bourbon, refill bourbon and sherry, resulting in exceptional smoky sweet notes with cinnamon and ginger spiciness.

TASTING NOTES


NOSE A malty sweetness on the nose complemented by gentle smoke in the background. Vanilla toffee gives way to a cinnamon spiciness.

TASTE Smoke comes to the fore followed up by syrupy sweetness, fresh citrus, creamy vanilla and honey, ending with a cinnamon and ginger spice.

FINISH Delicate smoke with a lingering and spicy sweetness.

The Producer

THE WILLIAM GRANT WAY


Thanks to natural alchemy and centuries-old craftsmanship, The Balvenie is unique among single malts. Our whisky-making process is dedicated to maintaining the Five Rare Crafts and we are the only distillery in Scotland that still grows its own barley, uses traditional floor maltings and keeps both a coppersmith and a team of coopers on site. And of course, our Malt Master David C. Stewart MBE presides over the all-important maturation process. Making The Balvenie the most hand-crafted of single malts.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.