Three Wine Company - Old Vine Field Blend 2017

$45.00
Sale price

Regular price $45.00

Our Old Vines Field Blend is sourced from ancient vineyards in Contra Costa County, and include Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Mataro (Mourvèdre), Carignane, and Alicante Bouschet. All the grapes in this blend come from vineyard blocks with extremely sandy soils called Delhi Sandy Loam.

This Delhi stratum was deposited around the Bay Area town of Oakley in Contra Costa County by the historic meandering of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, and was then blown into sand dunes by the massive cooling air which flows through the San Francisco Bay into the vast Central Valley of California. The Delhi soil classification is considered to have the lowest organic material and the highest sand content of any loam soil. These soil characteristics result in low vigor and extremely low yields. Sand is also phylloxera resistant so many of our vineyards are on their own roots.

Situated only 50 minutes from San Francisco by car, grapes have been planted and have been growing in this area for over 150 years. Most of these vineyards were planted by early Italian and Portuguese settlers. Some of these families, such as the Lucchesi, Evangelho, Spinelli, Gonsalves, and DelBarba have been tending the same vines for more than four generations. Due to the warm, dry microclimate and low vigor soils, sustainable vineyard practices are used by all of our growers.

1,987 cases produced.


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Three Wine Company

Three Wine Company is much more than a business. It is a family winery focused on sustainable growing, coupled with a hands-on wine experience. Winemaker Matt Cline’s philosophy is that: the dirt, the micro-climate, and sustainable wine growing (from vineyard to bottle) form the cornerstone of good winemaking, and is in every bottle Three produces.

Matt Cline is a 30+ year veteran to the business is still personally sampling each of the vineyards used in their wines, even though he could leave it to an intern or assistant to do. Matt’s wife and business partner Erin, is the tasting room General Manager, as well as managing online sales and business. As partners, Matt and Erin collaborate on everything from names and labels to the upcoming varietal productions.

Additionally, Three has a passion for preserving and educating on the historic varietals to California, such as Zinfandel, Mataro, and Carignane. In 2014 Cline with an alliance with the City of Oakley, and a large group of environmental and historical enthusiasts stood up to the State of California and saved a historic and high-quality vineyard. This vineyard is a wonderful example of sustainable agriculture as well as a relic of growers and winemakers from previous generations, and is found in Three's Lucchesi Carignane, SMC, CMZ, the Field Blend (at around 35-40%), and blended in our Zinfandels in small percentages.
--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need a lot of heat to ripen up. This has lead to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian grape varietal: Primitivo (Californian's call in Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. Chardonnay is the leading white followed by Sauvignon Blanc.


 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Our Old Vines Field Blend is sourced from ancient vineyards in Contra Costa County, and include Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Mataro (Mourvèdre), Carignane, and Alicante Bouschet. All the grapes in this blend come from vineyard blocks with extremely sandy soils called Delhi Sandy Loam.

This Delhi stratum was deposited around the Bay Area town of Oakley in Contra Costa County by the historic meandering of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, and was then blown into sand dunes by the massive cooling air which flows through the San Francisco Bay into the vast Central Valley of California. The Delhi soil classification is considered to have the lowest organic material and the highest sand content of any loam soil. These soil characteristics result in low vigor and extremely low yields. Sand is also phylloxera resistant so many of our vineyards are on their own roots.

Situated only 50 minutes from San Francisco by car, grapes have been planted and have been growing in this area for over 150 years. Most of these vineyards were planted by early Italian and Portuguese settlers. Some of these families, such as the Lucchesi, Evangelho, Spinelli, Gonsalves, and DelBarba have been tending the same vines for more than four generations. Due to the warm, dry microclimate and low vigor soils, sustainable vineyard practices are used by all of our growers.

1,987 cases produced.


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Three Wine Company

Three Wine Company is much more than a business. It is a family winery focused on sustainable growing, coupled with a hands-on wine experience. Winemaker Matt Cline’s philosophy is that: the dirt, the micro-climate, and sustainable wine growing (from vineyard to bottle) form the cornerstone of good winemaking, and is in every bottle Three produces.

Matt Cline is a 30+ year veteran to the business is still personally sampling each of the vineyards used in their wines, even though he could leave it to an intern or assistant to do. Matt’s wife and business partner Erin, is the tasting room General Manager, as well as managing online sales and business. As partners, Matt and Erin collaborate on everything from names and labels to the upcoming varietal productions.

Additionally, Three has a passion for preserving and educating on the historic varietals to California, such as Zinfandel, Mataro, and Carignane. In 2014 Cline with an alliance with the City of Oakley, and a large group of environmental and historical enthusiasts stood up to the State of California and saved a historic and high-quality vineyard. This vineyard is a wonderful example of sustainable agriculture as well as a relic of growers and winemakers from previous generations, and is found in Three's Lucchesi Carignane, SMC, CMZ, the Field Blend (at around 35-40%), and blended in our Zinfandels in small percentages.
--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need a lot of heat to ripen up. This has lead to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian grape varietal: Primitivo (Californian's call in Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. Chardonnay is the leading white followed by Sauvignon Blanc.


 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.