Tío Pepe Fino - En Rama 375ml

$23.00
Sale price

Regular price $23.00

Nose: intense and classic. Very mineral with perfect chalky notes, hay, olive brine and hints of almonds. Some iodine. Also this subtle hint of stables and wet animal fur. Bread crust.

Mouth: zippy and savoury as ever, though perhaps slightly rounder than other years? It’s yeasty, but there’s some sweet citrus and bitter almonds in the background alongside the tangy flor, brine, apple peelings and gentle bitterness of Mediterranean herbs and citrus zest. A very clean, long and lemony finish, which also brings back the hints of hay and subtle chamomile. The citrus really stands out the past couple of years.

The Producer

The Story behind the Brand: Tio Pepe

Tio Pepe (Uncle Joe) whose real name was Jose Maria Angel y Vargas was the maternal uncle of Manuel Maria Gonzalez Angel , a Sanluqueno, who founded the bodega in 1835. As a commercial clerk in Cadiz, Manuel Maria saw from the office windows large amounts of wine being exported from the quayside and thought to himself that this was the business to be in.


The rapid success of the bodega, founded by one who knew little or nothing of wine had to have a reason, and that was that Manuel Maria took on two partners (one called Dubosq) and was also helped by his uncle and one Francisco Gutierrez de Aguera, whose specialist advice was invaluable.  These two fostered an interest in the Fino wines in Manuel Maria, as also being from Sanlucar, this was what they enjoyed at a time when Jerez was exporting more of the Amontillado and sweetened Oloroso styles.


Uncle Joe drank Manzanilla, the Sanlucar Fino wine, and had little time for the heavier styles. Despite the prevailing preference for these, he set about obtaining and selecting carefully Fino wines in small parcels from almacenistas. In 1837 he acquired 102 arrobas (@ 1700 litres, or @ 3 butts) from Gregorio Ruiz –Bustamante at 65 Reales the arroba. With a few more parcels, by 1844 he had amassed 49 butts of selected Fino. Manuel Maria let his uncle have a bodega to do his blending work on the wine, and in 1849 – the 13th of March to be precise – the Tio Pepe bodega had a solera and 3 criaderas. One butt of this Fino wine had already been exported to England in 1844 to the company’s agent, one Robert Blake Byass, who didn’t like the look of this pallid wine at all.





This was the first time such a wine had appeared in England, a style that was virtually unknown until then. A butt was also sent to America, where in contrast to the English attitude, the firm’s agent promptly asked for more. By the 1860’s Tio Pepe was being drunk in various European countries including Spain, where Queen Isabel II, having visited the bodegas, became accustomed to drinking it as her daily aperitif. The palace got through about 600 bottles a year. The royal household, whose wines were ordered by Don Rafael Ortiz de Zuniga (a magistrate of the Supreme Tribunal and a personal friend of Manuel Maria) were sent in bottles, but the Fino was ordered every six months in barrels to conserve it better.  The first bottled Tio Pepe is thought to be that sent as a Christmas gift to Lord Brownlow Cecil, Governor of Gibraltar in 1856.


The criaderas – which had by now grown to six – and the solera was moved to the Bodega del Jardin, and while the brand was respected by other exporters it was only registered in 1888. All the while, Uncle Joe worked away in the bodega, entertaining friends and opening and closing when he felt like it. The prestige of Tio Pepe grew and grew, especially in the inter-war years thanks to Luis Perez Solero, the bodega’s marketing chief, who designed the now famous bottle wearing a red bolero jacket and sombrero. The brand is now the world’s most recognised Fino - indeed Sherry.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Nose: intense and classic. Very mineral with perfect chalky notes, hay, olive brine and hints of almonds. Some iodine. Also this subtle hint of stables and wet animal fur. Bread crust.

Mouth: zippy and savoury as ever, though perhaps slightly rounder than other years? It’s yeasty, but there’s some sweet citrus and bitter almonds in the background alongside the tangy flor, brine, apple peelings and gentle bitterness of Mediterranean herbs and citrus zest. A very clean, long and lemony finish, which also brings back the hints of hay and subtle chamomile. The citrus really stands out the past couple of years.

The Producer

The Story behind the Brand: Tio Pepe

Tio Pepe (Uncle Joe) whose real name was Jose Maria Angel y Vargas was the maternal uncle of Manuel Maria Gonzalez Angel , a Sanluqueno, who founded the bodega in 1835. As a commercial clerk in Cadiz, Manuel Maria saw from the office windows large amounts of wine being exported from the quayside and thought to himself that this was the business to be in.


The rapid success of the bodega, founded by one who knew little or nothing of wine had to have a reason, and that was that Manuel Maria took on two partners (one called Dubosq) and was also helped by his uncle and one Francisco Gutierrez de Aguera, whose specialist advice was invaluable.  These two fostered an interest in the Fino wines in Manuel Maria, as also being from Sanlucar, this was what they enjoyed at a time when Jerez was exporting more of the Amontillado and sweetened Oloroso styles.


Uncle Joe drank Manzanilla, the Sanlucar Fino wine, and had little time for the heavier styles. Despite the prevailing preference for these, he set about obtaining and selecting carefully Fino wines in small parcels from almacenistas. In 1837 he acquired 102 arrobas (@ 1700 litres, or @ 3 butts) from Gregorio Ruiz –Bustamante at 65 Reales the arroba. With a few more parcels, by 1844 he had amassed 49 butts of selected Fino. Manuel Maria let his uncle have a bodega to do his blending work on the wine, and in 1849 – the 13th of March to be precise – the Tio Pepe bodega had a solera and 3 criaderas. One butt of this Fino wine had already been exported to England in 1844 to the company’s agent, one Robert Blake Byass, who didn’t like the look of this pallid wine at all.





This was the first time such a wine had appeared in England, a style that was virtually unknown until then. A butt was also sent to America, where in contrast to the English attitude, the firm’s agent promptly asked for more. By the 1860’s Tio Pepe was being drunk in various European countries including Spain, where Queen Isabel II, having visited the bodegas, became accustomed to drinking it as her daily aperitif. The palace got through about 600 bottles a year. The royal household, whose wines were ordered by Don Rafael Ortiz de Zuniga (a magistrate of the Supreme Tribunal and a personal friend of Manuel Maria) were sent in bottles, but the Fino was ordered every six months in barrels to conserve it better.  The first bottled Tio Pepe is thought to be that sent as a Christmas gift to Lord Brownlow Cecil, Governor of Gibraltar in 1856.


The criaderas – which had by now grown to six – and the solera was moved to the Bodega del Jardin, and while the brand was respected by other exporters it was only registered in 1888. All the while, Uncle Joe worked away in the bodega, entertaining friends and opening and closing when he felt like it. The prestige of Tio Pepe grew and grew, especially in the inter-war years thanks to Luis Perez Solero, the bodega’s marketing chief, who designed the now famous bottle wearing a red bolero jacket and sombrero. The brand is now the world’s most recognised Fino - indeed Sherry.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.