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Tokaj Oremus - Tokaji Aszú 3 Puttonyos 2014

$96.00
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Regular price $96.00

The Aszú wines are aged in 136-litre (called "Gönc") and 220-litre ("Szerednye") small barrels. Oak from the mountains that border the winemaking region is used to manufacture the barrels. The Aszú ageing takes place in underground wineries dug out in the volcanic soil. The wine is left to age here for 2 to 3 years, at a constant temperature and degree of humidity. After being bottled, the Oremus Aszú is left to continue ageing in the bottle for a year, which is the opportunity for it to embark on a journey of development that can even last several decades.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tokaj Oremus

he Tokaj area, Tokaj-Hegyalja is located on a mountain chain in north-eastern Hungary. The town of Tolcsva and the Oremus wineries are located in geographical centre of that region.

In 2002, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee recognised the exceptional winemaking conditions of the Tokaj region, its secular capacity to foster culture and its value, and awarded it World Heritage status.

In 1993, just 3 years after the fall of Communism, the Alvarez family turned its sights to Hungary and founded Tokaj-Oremus Viñedos y Bodegas. The estate's activities are mainly based in Tolcsva, where a modern winemaking winery was built in 1999 and is connected to the maze of cellars that have been found there since the 13th century.

The Álvarez family placed great emphasis on the respectful and detailed study of this wine to establish its production process and its history. It also strived as far as possible to conserve the tradition when it oversaw the works to build the new winery.

In order to manage the new project, which was based around one of the best located and most iconic vineyards of the region, it recruited a driven professional team, with in-depth knowledge of the land, and it looked for an experienced and full-time local winemaker to place it at the head of that group.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

The Aszú wines are aged in 136-litre (called "Gönc") and 220-litre ("Szerednye") small barrels. Oak from the mountains that border the winemaking region is used to manufacture the barrels. The Aszú ageing takes place in underground wineries dug out in the volcanic soil. The wine is left to age here for 2 to 3 years, at a constant temperature and degree of humidity. After being bottled, the Oremus Aszú is left to continue ageing in the bottle for a year, which is the opportunity for it to embark on a journey of development that can even last several decades.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tokaj Oremus

he Tokaj area, Tokaj-Hegyalja is located on a mountain chain in north-eastern Hungary. The town of Tolcsva and the Oremus wineries are located in geographical centre of that region.

In 2002, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee recognised the exceptional winemaking conditions of the Tokaj region, its secular capacity to foster culture and its value, and awarded it World Heritage status.

In 1993, just 3 years after the fall of Communism, the Alvarez family turned its sights to Hungary and founded Tokaj-Oremus Viñedos y Bodegas. The estate's activities are mainly based in Tolcsva, where a modern winemaking winery was built in 1999 and is connected to the maze of cellars that have been found there since the 13th century.

The Álvarez family placed great emphasis on the respectful and detailed study of this wine to establish its production process and its history. It also strived as far as possible to conserve the tradition when it oversaw the works to build the new winery.

In order to manage the new project, which was based around one of the best located and most iconic vineyards of the region, it recruited a driven professional team, with in-depth knowledge of the land, and it looked for an experienced and full-time local winemaker to place it at the head of that group.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.