Two Hands Ares Shiraz 2018

$215.00
Sale price

Regular price $215.00

SPOTLIGHT ON

ARES SHIRAZ

Shiraz is at the heart of the Two Hands story and our vineyard selections give us access to some of the greatest parcels of Shiraz grapes in the country. Each year, every one of the 1,500 barrels of Shiraz is tasted in the search for the very finest cuvée to represent Ares, the pinnacle of our Shiraz production.

The handful of barrels that make it through are matured for 24 months in new and one-year-old French oak, and retasted again and again to ensure only the best make the final blend. A statuesque, powerful and deeply flavoured wine that combines elegance and vivacity.

 

The Producer

 

Quality without compromise is central to the Two Hands philosophy, driving all the decisions from fruit and oak selection to packaging and promotion.

From the outset, Two Hands set out to be unique and innovative, this approach is reflected in everything from the names of the wines through to, not least, the wines themselves.  From small beginnings, the winery has been able to manage its growth organically whilst maintaining an absolute quality focus.

Premium fruit is sourced from the finest Shiraz growing regions in Australia, and Two Hands works closely with its estate vineyards and band of growers to ensure the full potential of each vineyard is reached.  We handle every parcel of fruit, however small, separately from crushing through to fermentation and oak maturation to ensure complexity and personality in the finished wines.

In its simplest form, it could be said that we squeeze the grapes and put them in a bottle. However, in practice there are many different steps and countless hours involved, from vineyard, through to winemaking, tasting, blending and maturation in order to make consistent, quality wines.

…we strive to produce wines that reflect their origin, meaning that they show the characteristics that we associate with the regions and vineyard sites from where the fruit was sourced.

With regards to our winemaking style, we strive to produce wines that reflect their origin, meaning that they show the characteristics that we associate with the regions and vineyard sites from where the fruit was sourced. Fruit is the primary feature of the wines, supported by the tannin and acid structure.  The wine are all a product of the vineyard, where Michael makes all the picking decisions based on flavour and tannin ripeness in early morning walks through the harvest season from February to April each year.

Minimal intervention and oak handling thereafter allow the character of the fruit to shine through.  Six months after vintage, every barrel in the winery is blind tasted by Michael and the winemaking team and given a classification grade associated with its place in the Two Hands portfolio: from A+ to D (and anything C or below not used in Two Hands final production).  With this focus on detail, it means only the best barrels make it through and quality is maintained even in the toughest vintages, albeit at lower quantities.

At Two Hands, we are very lucky in that we love what we do, and hope this is communicated through our wines and the Two Hands philosophy.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

SPOTLIGHT ON

ARES SHIRAZ

Shiraz is at the heart of the Two Hands story and our vineyard selections give us access to some of the greatest parcels of Shiraz grapes in the country. Each year, every one of the 1,500 barrels of Shiraz is tasted in the search for the very finest cuvée to represent Ares, the pinnacle of our Shiraz production.

The handful of barrels that make it through are matured for 24 months in new and one-year-old French oak, and retasted again and again to ensure only the best make the final blend. A statuesque, powerful and deeply flavoured wine that combines elegance and vivacity.

 

The Producer

 

Quality without compromise is central to the Two Hands philosophy, driving all the decisions from fruit and oak selection to packaging and promotion.

From the outset, Two Hands set out to be unique and innovative, this approach is reflected in everything from the names of the wines through to, not least, the wines themselves.  From small beginnings, the winery has been able to manage its growth organically whilst maintaining an absolute quality focus.

Premium fruit is sourced from the finest Shiraz growing regions in Australia, and Two Hands works closely with its estate vineyards and band of growers to ensure the full potential of each vineyard is reached.  We handle every parcel of fruit, however small, separately from crushing through to fermentation and oak maturation to ensure complexity and personality in the finished wines.

In its simplest form, it could be said that we squeeze the grapes and put them in a bottle. However, in practice there are many different steps and countless hours involved, from vineyard, through to winemaking, tasting, blending and maturation in order to make consistent, quality wines.

…we strive to produce wines that reflect their origin, meaning that they show the characteristics that we associate with the regions and vineyard sites from where the fruit was sourced.

With regards to our winemaking style, we strive to produce wines that reflect their origin, meaning that they show the characteristics that we associate with the regions and vineyard sites from where the fruit was sourced. Fruit is the primary feature of the wines, supported by the tannin and acid structure.  The wine are all a product of the vineyard, where Michael makes all the picking decisions based on flavour and tannin ripeness in early morning walks through the harvest season from February to April each year.

Minimal intervention and oak handling thereafter allow the character of the fruit to shine through.  Six months after vintage, every barrel in the winery is blind tasted by Michael and the winemaking team and given a classification grade associated with its place in the Two Hands portfolio: from A+ to D (and anything C or below not used in Two Hands final production).  With this focus on detail, it means only the best barrels make it through and quality is maintained even in the toughest vintages, albeit at lower quantities.

At Two Hands, we are very lucky in that we love what we do, and hope this is communicated through our wines and the Two Hands philosophy.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.