Two Hands 'Yacca Block' Shiraz 2019

$145.00
Sale price

Regular price $145.00

Yacca Block sits at the top of Menglers Hill and is a prime example of the role sub-regionality plays in serious winemaking, with this vineyard only a 25 minutes drive from the Western Ranges of the Barossa Valley.

The soil here is a mix of both quartz and ironstone and the vineyard’s high altitude allows for slow ripening that leads to a very soft and elegant Shiraz. Grower Joel Mattschoss has been a great supporter and friend of Two Hands, recently starting a business partnership with a new, exciting project titled ‘Love Over Gold’. This vineyard site also supplies Shiraz for Charlie’s Garden, and Riesling for The Boy.

SUB-REGION: Menglers-Hill
VINE AGE: 14 years
ALTITUDE: 483m
AVERAGE RAINFALL: 580mm
SOIL TYPE: Shallow, skeletal grey sand loam with quartz gravel over weathered rock and yellow clay.

  • TECHNICAL INFORMATION

     

    Closure Type Cork
    Volume (ml) 750ml
    Varietal Shiraz
    Region Eden Valley

    Alcohol (% vol.)

    14.9%

     

    The Producer

     At Two Hands Wines, a key part of our journey is the further development of our own estate vineyards.

    A chance conversation last year provided Michael with the opportunity to consolidate Two Hands’ vineyard holdings on Seppeltsfield Road, taking us to 900m of frontage along the gateway to the Western Ranges of the Barossa Valley.  The most recent addition to our estate, the ‘Holy Grail’ vineyard, is a viticulturist’s dream: 15 acres of 18 year old Shiraz, adjoining our existing 70 acre block which is ready for planting from 2016.  With its rich red-brown earth, strong clonal selection and its eastern sloping aspect, we’ve already seen some huge potential in the wines from our first harvest in 2015, even at this early age.

    After extensive soil studies and viticultural research, plans are well underway for turning this property into one of the iconic vineyards of the Barossa.  Nothing from here is being left to chance.

    With a vast array of soil depths and types through the site, careful consideration has been placed on selecting a diversified range of Shiraz clones to optimise viticultural development across the property.  Through the depths of winter 2015, the Two Hands winery team were out with snips in hand, taking 40,000 cuttings from some of the great vineyards in the Barossa, Clare and Eden Valley regions.  The clonal diversity will create interest on the palate too once the vines reach maturity, designed to take us away from the commonplace 1654 clone that was so widely planted across South Australia in the late 1990s and early 2000s.  The site also lends itself to other varieties and space has been set aside for small sections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache and Mourvèdre, to complement our portfolio.

    The Holy Grail vineyard is a viticulturist’s dream

    For now the focus is on the growing season in our existing vineyards, but after vintage 2016 is when the real fun begins. Various activities will enter into full swing, with deep ripping of the vine rows to prepare the soils for planting, as well as irrigation and trellis installation. As we head into early September 2016, the mammoth task of vine planting will begin, with a grand total of over 60,000 vines to be planted on our new site over two years.  Once fully developed, Two Hands holdings will move to 120 acres under vine in the Western Ranges, plenty to keep my hands full.

    As well as the new development, the current Two Hands estate vineyards are growing at a promising rate. From Kraehe House Block in Marananga to Coach House Block in Greenock, the yield for next vintage is looking as strong and consistent as we’ve seen in the Barossa for a few years.  Growing the highest quality grapes, we would expect our estate vineyards to crop to a relatively low figure of 2.5 tonnes of fruit per acre, but we have fallen well short of this in recent years on the back of lower winter rains and warmer growing seasons.

    The combination of our existing blocks and new developments provides a fascinating contrast and will provide an enormous source of fruit styles for the winemaking team to work with as the vines mature over the years ahead.  Exciting times indeed.

     

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Yacca Block sits at the top of Menglers Hill and is a prime example of the role sub-regionality plays in serious winemaking, with this vineyard only a 25 minutes drive from the Western Ranges of the Barossa Valley.

The soil here is a mix of both quartz and ironstone and the vineyard’s high altitude allows for slow ripening that leads to a very soft and elegant Shiraz. Grower Joel Mattschoss has been a great supporter and friend of Two Hands, recently starting a business partnership with a new, exciting project titled ‘Love Over Gold’. This vineyard site also supplies Shiraz for Charlie’s Garden, and Riesling for The Boy.

SUB-REGION: Menglers-Hill
VINE AGE: 14 years
ALTITUDE: 483m
AVERAGE RAINFALL: 580mm
SOIL TYPE: Shallow, skeletal grey sand loam with quartz gravel over weathered rock and yellow clay.

  • TECHNICAL INFORMATION

     

    Closure Type Cork
    Volume (ml) 750ml
    Varietal Shiraz
    Region Eden Valley

    Alcohol (% vol.)

    14.9%

     

    The Producer

     At Two Hands Wines, a key part of our journey is the further development of our own estate vineyards.

    A chance conversation last year provided Michael with the opportunity to consolidate Two Hands’ vineyard holdings on Seppeltsfield Road, taking us to 900m of frontage along the gateway to the Western Ranges of the Barossa Valley.  The most recent addition to our estate, the ‘Holy Grail’ vineyard, is a viticulturist’s dream: 15 acres of 18 year old Shiraz, adjoining our existing 70 acre block which is ready for planting from 2016.  With its rich red-brown earth, strong clonal selection and its eastern sloping aspect, we’ve already seen some huge potential in the wines from our first harvest in 2015, even at this early age.

    After extensive soil studies and viticultural research, plans are well underway for turning this property into one of the iconic vineyards of the Barossa.  Nothing from here is being left to chance.

    With a vast array of soil depths and types through the site, careful consideration has been placed on selecting a diversified range of Shiraz clones to optimise viticultural development across the property.  Through the depths of winter 2015, the Two Hands winery team were out with snips in hand, taking 40,000 cuttings from some of the great vineyards in the Barossa, Clare and Eden Valley regions.  The clonal diversity will create interest on the palate too once the vines reach maturity, designed to take us away from the commonplace 1654 clone that was so widely planted across South Australia in the late 1990s and early 2000s.  The site also lends itself to other varieties and space has been set aside for small sections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache and Mourvèdre, to complement our portfolio.

    The Holy Grail vineyard is a viticulturist’s dream

    For now the focus is on the growing season in our existing vineyards, but after vintage 2016 is when the real fun begins. Various activities will enter into full swing, with deep ripping of the vine rows to prepare the soils for planting, as well as irrigation and trellis installation. As we head into early September 2016, the mammoth task of vine planting will begin, with a grand total of over 60,000 vines to be planted on our new site over two years.  Once fully developed, Two Hands holdings will move to 120 acres under vine in the Western Ranges, plenty to keep my hands full.

    As well as the new development, the current Two Hands estate vineyards are growing at a promising rate. From Kraehe House Block in Marananga to Coach House Block in Greenock, the yield for next vintage is looking as strong and consistent as we’ve seen in the Barossa for a few years.  Growing the highest quality grapes, we would expect our estate vineyards to crop to a relatively low figure of 2.5 tonnes of fruit per acre, but we have fallen well short of this in recent years on the back of lower winter rains and warmer growing seasons.

    The combination of our existing blocks and new developments provides a fascinating contrast and will provide an enormous source of fruit styles for the winemaking team to work with as the vines mature over the years ahead.  Exciting times indeed.

     

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.