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Unkel Wines - 'Jurassic' Pinot Noir 2020

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

Winery notes (2020 Vintage)
JURASSIC - This Pinot is a lighter, more fruit-forward style than many. When the sun dips into the horizon, it's time to rip out the sundowners! Aimed at those looking for a red wine for warm weather imbibing, look no further. It’s light in weight but has a burst of raspberries that is focused by a bright drive of acidity.

WINEMAKING - 100% Destemmed (clone 777) and fermented in stainless steel tank for 2 weeks before being pressed back to tank.

Organic x Unfiltered x Unfined

--------THE PRODUCER--------

UNKEL

Like many great New Zealand producers, Rob Burley found his place in the wine world after working for a number of great like-minded producers abroad. Though Rob worked vintages in NZ, France and America, it wasn’t until he moved to Australia and started to work for Bill Downie and Patrick Sullivan that the concept for Unkel Wines was born.

After doing his time working for Bill and Patrick in Australia, Rob and his wife Kate decided to move back to New Zealand and start a family. Eventually they settled on Nelson where they took over an old organic estate and winery just prior to the 2019 vintage. 
For Unkel, their biggest goal was always to grow and make their own wines from their own fruit, so for 2020 their dream is now their reality, and the 2020 wines are everything they have set out to do.
All the wines are organically farmed, dry-farmed (unirrigated), hand harvested, wild fermented, unfiltered and unfined. Minimal sulphites of 15-25mg/L are added at bottling to ensure stability (all suitable for glass pour). All of the 2020 release is in clear glass, bottled under Nomacorc (TCA free) and are hand-dipped in wax (which we promise is not flaky this year!)

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Nelson

Located in the north-west of South Island, this warm enclave is hemmed in by Mount Arthur and the Southern Alps. Riesling has found its feet among the free-draining, stony silt soils while Gewürztraminer also shows potential.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Winery notes (2020 Vintage)
JURASSIC - This Pinot is a lighter, more fruit-forward style than many. When the sun dips into the horizon, it's time to rip out the sundowners! Aimed at those looking for a red wine for warm weather imbibing, look no further. It’s light in weight but has a burst of raspberries that is focused by a bright drive of acidity.

WINEMAKING - 100% Destemmed (clone 777) and fermented in stainless steel tank for 2 weeks before being pressed back to tank.

Organic x Unfiltered x Unfined

--------THE PRODUCER--------

UNKEL

Like many great New Zealand producers, Rob Burley found his place in the wine world after working for a number of great like-minded producers abroad. Though Rob worked vintages in NZ, France and America, it wasn’t until he moved to Australia and started to work for Bill Downie and Patrick Sullivan that the concept for Unkel Wines was born.

After doing his time working for Bill and Patrick in Australia, Rob and his wife Kate decided to move back to New Zealand and start a family. Eventually they settled on Nelson where they took over an old organic estate and winery just prior to the 2019 vintage. 
For Unkel, their biggest goal was always to grow and make their own wines from their own fruit, so for 2020 their dream is now their reality, and the 2020 wines are everything they have set out to do.
All the wines are organically farmed, dry-farmed (unirrigated), hand harvested, wild fermented, unfiltered and unfined. Minimal sulphites of 15-25mg/L are added at bottling to ensure stability (all suitable for glass pour). All of the 2020 release is in clear glass, bottled under Nomacorc (TCA free) and are hand-dipped in wax (which we promise is not flaky this year!)

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Nelson

Located in the north-west of South Island, this warm enclave is hemmed in by Mount Arthur and the Southern Alps. Riesling has found its feet among the free-draining, stony silt soils while Gewürztraminer also shows potential.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.