Valli - 'Thiefy Waitaki' Pinot Noir 2020

$86.00
Sale price

Regular price $86.00

We can thank Jen Parr for the “Thiefy” wine. You may well remember the “one off” wine to immortalise her beloved dog Missy.  In Jens exact words:

“Grant you know I have never wanted to make my own wines as I consider what we make at Valli to be mine as much as yours, BUT I would love to bottle a small amount of something special to remind me of Missy”.

That request came with a PLEASE, spoken in capitals along with the statement that it would be a one off. How could I say no?

A little over a year later, this time it was an offer, not a request.
“Grant we have a couple of barrels of stunning, classic Waitaki Pinot Noir that if you wanted we could label in honour of your new dog Thiefy as she came from the Waitaki”?

Unlike the previous years “request” there wasn’t a moment of hesitation before saying yes.  Trying to understand why that “yes” came out so fast, a couple of reasons presented themselves:

First, the very satisfying feeling of handing over a cheque for a significant portion of the profits to Pound Paws Animal Rescue and realising we could do that all over again.


Secondly, recognising that at some stage in the future this wine would be in our lives long after Thiefy wasn’t, and with each bottle opened memories of her will return.

I admit it: This is a wine we made for ourselves, but that doesn’t mean we can’t share it and you can’t enjoy it as well.

 

I would like to share the full Thiefy story with you.
 
Thiefy, previously known as Phoebe, was an unwanted, mistreated one year old “rescue” pup we adopted through Pound Paws in Oamaru.
She is part Collie (the worlds most intelligent dog, you can google for confirmation). We don’t know what the other half is, but whatever it is google must be wrong as she is smarter than any 100 % Collie I know.

As two of our neighbours have dogs named Phoebe the decision that along with a new life there would also be a new name was an easy one to make.
But what name?
We thought she should decide herself, and that didn’t take long. After collecting her from North Otago, the first stop was for her was to meet Nicole (after all the 3 of us would be sharing the same house.)

Nicole was in her friend’s wool shop, I took Thiefy in, where she headed straight to the balls of wool, put her teeth around an orange one and headed right back out the door, simultaneously identifying her favourite colour and herself as a little thief.
Next stop was home, more thievery, this time it was the cat’s food. It didn’t stop there. Being early  autumn it was time to fill the wheelbarrow with fire wood and as fast as I was bringing armfuls inside, she was stealing mouthfuls to take away for latter chewing.  We did have warning though, as her doggie tinder profile at the rescue centre said her favourite game was stealing the other dogs’ toys.

What she really has stolen though is our hearts.
While it’s not possible to describe on a wine label or in an email how much pure joy we have had watching Thiefy turn into the dog she is now and of the absolute pleasure her company brings every day, it is possible to help many other dogs just like her. By purchasing this wine, you have helped us do exactly that.

Thank you.



Grant, Nicole, Thiefy and the whole dog loving family at VALLI

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Valli

Grant Taylor’s name is synonymous with Otago Pinot Noir. As owner and winemaker, Grant has been crafting wines there since 1993 when the region was in its infancy with only 20 ha planted, (today there are over 1700). Grant’s accomplishments are well known in the wine world, he is possibly New Zealand’s most awarded Pinot Noir producer, credited with winning the Best Pinot Noir Trophy at a major International Wine Competition in London an unprecedented three times – a feat achieved by no other winemaker in the world.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Central Otago

Central Otago is one of the most southerly wine regions in the world and it is most commonly referred to as Pinot Central, in New Zealand. It has a long history of winemaking dating back to the mid 1800s and in fact a 'Burgundy' from Central Otago won a gold medal in a Sydney wine competition in 1881. A few winemakers including Alan Brady helped to craft it into a leading Pinot Noir region for the world thanks to his fruit-bombs. Many fantastic aromatic white wines excel here also.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

We can thank Jen Parr for the “Thiefy” wine. You may well remember the “one off” wine to immortalise her beloved dog Missy.  In Jens exact words:

“Grant you know I have never wanted to make my own wines as I consider what we make at Valli to be mine as much as yours, BUT I would love to bottle a small amount of something special to remind me of Missy”.

That request came with a PLEASE, spoken in capitals along with the statement that it would be a one off. How could I say no?

A little over a year later, this time it was an offer, not a request.
“Grant we have a couple of barrels of stunning, classic Waitaki Pinot Noir that if you wanted we could label in honour of your new dog Thiefy as she came from the Waitaki”?

Unlike the previous years “request” there wasn’t a moment of hesitation before saying yes.  Trying to understand why that “yes” came out so fast, a couple of reasons presented themselves:

First, the very satisfying feeling of handing over a cheque for a significant portion of the profits to Pound Paws Animal Rescue and realising we could do that all over again.


Secondly, recognising that at some stage in the future this wine would be in our lives long after Thiefy wasn’t, and with each bottle opened memories of her will return.

I admit it: This is a wine we made for ourselves, but that doesn’t mean we can’t share it and you can’t enjoy it as well.

 

I would like to share the full Thiefy story with you.
 
Thiefy, previously known as Phoebe, was an unwanted, mistreated one year old “rescue” pup we adopted through Pound Paws in Oamaru.
She is part Collie (the worlds most intelligent dog, you can google for confirmation). We don’t know what the other half is, but whatever it is google must be wrong as she is smarter than any 100 % Collie I know.

As two of our neighbours have dogs named Phoebe the decision that along with a new life there would also be a new name was an easy one to make.
But what name?
We thought she should decide herself, and that didn’t take long. After collecting her from North Otago, the first stop was for her was to meet Nicole (after all the 3 of us would be sharing the same house.)

Nicole was in her friend’s wool shop, I took Thiefy in, where she headed straight to the balls of wool, put her teeth around an orange one and headed right back out the door, simultaneously identifying her favourite colour and herself as a little thief.
Next stop was home, more thievery, this time it was the cat’s food. It didn’t stop there. Being early  autumn it was time to fill the wheelbarrow with fire wood and as fast as I was bringing armfuls inside, she was stealing mouthfuls to take away for latter chewing.  We did have warning though, as her doggie tinder profile at the rescue centre said her favourite game was stealing the other dogs’ toys.

What she really has stolen though is our hearts.
While it’s not possible to describe on a wine label or in an email how much pure joy we have had watching Thiefy turn into the dog she is now and of the absolute pleasure her company brings every day, it is possible to help many other dogs just like her. By purchasing this wine, you have helped us do exactly that.

Thank you.



Grant, Nicole, Thiefy and the whole dog loving family at VALLI

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Valli

Grant Taylor’s name is synonymous with Otago Pinot Noir. As owner and winemaker, Grant has been crafting wines there since 1993 when the region was in its infancy with only 20 ha planted, (today there are over 1700). Grant’s accomplishments are well known in the wine world, he is possibly New Zealand’s most awarded Pinot Noir producer, credited with winning the Best Pinot Noir Trophy at a major International Wine Competition in London an unprecedented three times – a feat achieved by no other winemaker in the world.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Central Otago

Central Otago is one of the most southerly wine regions in the world and it is most commonly referred to as Pinot Central, in New Zealand. It has a long history of winemaking dating back to the mid 1800s and in fact a 'Burgundy' from Central Otago won a gold medal in a Sydney wine competition in 1881. A few winemakers including Alan Brady helped to craft it into a leading Pinot Noir region for the world thanks to his fruit-bombs. Many fantastic aromatic white wines excel here also.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.