Waterford - 'The Cuvee' Irish Single Malt Whisky

$130.00
Sale price

Regular price $130.00
Whisky Advocate’s Editors’ Choice, Spring 2022 - 91 Points
Appearance: Golden sunrise with intense oils.

Nose: Red apples, fresh dry soil, breadcrust, green foliage, lavender, digestive biscuits, oranges, barmbrack, over ripe banana skin, a summer flower bed, fresh mint, coffee cake.

Taste: Clove sweets, white pepper, oily, grapefruit, lemon zest, dark chocolate, dry toast, cherries, granola bar, dried herbs, aniseed, green olives, 3 peel marmalade.

Finish: Pepper up front with oily spiciness that softens, starts dry but then gets mouth-watering & lingers where I close my eyes and relax!

THE CATHEDRAL


We have worked with a total of 97 Irish growers to date, around 40 a year – some organic, some biodynamic, some heritage grains. All of our whiskies therefore use 100% demonstrably Irish-grown barley – one farm, one terroir, at a time. After harvest every year, the roads of rural Ireland become filled with our growers’ tractors carrying Single Farm Origin barley, and around the same time they converge upon a special bespoke storage facility, strategically sited at the centre of our barley heartlands.


This is a one-of-a-kind wonder-structure that we call our Cathedral of Barley – and next to it, as we add more growers, stands our Chapel. Built specifically for our requirements, a logistical challenge in its own right, without each farm’s individual crop slumbering in its own bin, in separation and ideal conditions, there can be no integrity or traceability. An unsung hero, the Cathedral is the terroir-enabler.

We rigorously apply the ancient terroir methodology to today’s verdant landscape of Ireland, home of the world’s finest barley. Now for the first time in single malt whisky – unashamedly inspired by the legendary châteaux of France – we reach the apogee of this radical philosophy.

Our distillery, the technological marvel we call the Facilitator, enables us to create elite whisky – farm by farm, terroir by terroir. State-of-the-art equipment marries with ancient knowledge, locally grown Irish barley with extended fermentations, unhurried distillation & an array of exceptional oak. It has provided a unique library of Single Farm Origins – each expressing its own identity, its own voice.

This unprecedented spectrum of flavours must now reach its crescendo: we have celebrated & explored the singles; now we produce our more immersive concept album. For layered together inthis cerebral fusion of flavours, these component Waterford Whiskies come together, culminating in our ultimate experience: textured, complex & compelling.

TERROIR IS THE 3D INTERACTION ON A PLANT OF SOIL, MICROCLIMATE AND SITE. IT INFLUENCES HOW THE BARLEY GROWS AND THUS THE FLAVOURS CONTAINED WITHIN THE GRAIN. CAPTURED FARM BY FARM, TERROIR REQUIRES AN EXTENSIVE LOGISTICAL INFRASTRUCTURE TO VERIFY AND PROVE ITS INFLUENCE – EACH TERROIR IS A NEW STARTING POINT FOR OUR WHISKY. WE ARE FASCINATED BY THESE NUANCES. WE HOPE YOU WILL BE TOO.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Whisky Advocate’s Editors’ Choice, Spring 2022 - 91 Points
Appearance: Golden sunrise with intense oils.

Nose: Red apples, fresh dry soil, breadcrust, green foliage, lavender, digestive biscuits, oranges, barmbrack, over ripe banana skin, a summer flower bed, fresh mint, coffee cake.

Taste: Clove sweets, white pepper, oily, grapefruit, lemon zest, dark chocolate, dry toast, cherries, granola bar, dried herbs, aniseed, green olives, 3 peel marmalade.

Finish: Pepper up front with oily spiciness that softens, starts dry but then gets mouth-watering & lingers where I close my eyes and relax!

THE CATHEDRAL


We have worked with a total of 97 Irish growers to date, around 40 a year – some organic, some biodynamic, some heritage grains. All of our whiskies therefore use 100% demonstrably Irish-grown barley – one farm, one terroir, at a time. After harvest every year, the roads of rural Ireland become filled with our growers’ tractors carrying Single Farm Origin barley, and around the same time they converge upon a special bespoke storage facility, strategically sited at the centre of our barley heartlands.


This is a one-of-a-kind wonder-structure that we call our Cathedral of Barley – and next to it, as we add more growers, stands our Chapel. Built specifically for our requirements, a logistical challenge in its own right, without each farm’s individual crop slumbering in its own bin, in separation and ideal conditions, there can be no integrity or traceability. An unsung hero, the Cathedral is the terroir-enabler.

We rigorously apply the ancient terroir methodology to today’s verdant landscape of Ireland, home of the world’s finest barley. Now for the first time in single malt whisky – unashamedly inspired by the legendary châteaux of France – we reach the apogee of this radical philosophy.

Our distillery, the technological marvel we call the Facilitator, enables us to create elite whisky – farm by farm, terroir by terroir. State-of-the-art equipment marries with ancient knowledge, locally grown Irish barley with extended fermentations, unhurried distillation & an array of exceptional oak. It has provided a unique library of Single Farm Origins – each expressing its own identity, its own voice.

This unprecedented spectrum of flavours must now reach its crescendo: we have celebrated & explored the singles; now we produce our more immersive concept album. For layered together inthis cerebral fusion of flavours, these component Waterford Whiskies come together, culminating in our ultimate experience: textured, complex & compelling.

TERROIR IS THE 3D INTERACTION ON A PLANT OF SOIL, MICROCLIMATE AND SITE. IT INFLUENCES HOW THE BARLEY GROWS AND THUS THE FLAVOURS CONTAINED WITHIN THE GRAIN. CAPTURED FARM BY FARM, TERROIR REQUIRES AN EXTENSIVE LOGISTICAL INFRASTRUCTURE TO VERIFY AND PROVE ITS INFLUENCE – EACH TERROIR IS A NEW STARTING POINT FOR OUR WHISKY. WE ARE FASCINATED BY THESE NUANCES. WE HOPE YOU WILL BE TOO.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.