Wirra Wirra - 'Scrubby Rise' Shiraz 2019

$21.00
Sale price

Regular price $21.00

Grape Variety Shiraz 100% Colour Bright crimson with a fuchsia rim. Bouquet Blackberry, plum and raspberry alongside black pepper and a hint of biscuity oak. Palate Ripe red fruits combine with plush tannins for an exceptionally approachable texture and a rich, mouth-filling quality. Drink For immediate enjoyment and over the next five years. Food Match Spaghetti meatballs in a tomato and basil sauce, served with parmesan.

Vinification: Fruit was gently crushed and de-stemmed prior to commencing fermentation where fermentation temperatures were kept at 20-22ºC, rising to 25-28ºC at peak of ferment. Generally, ferments were pumped over two to four times daily to assist in sufficient flavour and colour extraction, as well as to monitor and control fermentation temperature. Nearing completion and having achieved the desired flavour and tannin extraction, pumpovers were reduced to once or twice daily to keep the cap (skins and seeds) moist. At approximately 1-2°Baume, the juice from the fermenter was drained, and the remaining skins were pressed via tank or basket press. Wines completed malolactic fermentation in tank or barrel as individual vineyard parcels and matured in oak before blending.

Planted in 1972, the Scrubby Rise vineyards at Wirra Wirra sit on ancient rocks more than 100,000 years old. The fact that they are totally flat and contain no “scrub” or bush whatsoever was of more interest to the late Greg Trott, who gave them their dubious name. As one might call a redhead “Bluey” or a tall man “Shorty”, Trott drew on traditional Aussie humour to make the point that we shouldn’t take life too seriously. Be dedicated to your task he said, but everything else should be fun. That’s a philosophy we aspire to at Wirra Wirra, as we raise a glass of this classic McLaren Vale shiraz.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Wirra Wirra

The ironstone cellars of Wirra Wirra house a history rich in mischief, adventure and dedication to creating great wines.  The winery was built in 1894 by an eccentric former state cricketer, who absconded to McLaren Vale after embarrassing his family one too many times. 

It was re-built in the late 1960's by a visionary who dreamt of returning Wirra Wirra to its former glory. Greg Trott did more than that, he created a legacy of being dedicated to your craft while being equally serious about having fun and enjoying life.    

 

 

--------THE REGION--------

McLaren Vale

Only 45 minutes south of Adelaide in South Australia, McLaren Vale is home to sustainable winegrowing, world-class wines and culinary experiences, as well as pristine natural attractions and unparalleled tourism offerings.

South Australia's viticultural origins began in McLaren Vale and our region's Mediterranean climate continues to drive our region's wine style and diverse food culture.

Best known for Shiraz, McLaren Vale also excels in the production of ultra-premium Grenache and Cabernet. Spanish and Italian varieties such as Fiano, Vermentino, Tempranillo and Sangiovese are also very well suited climatically and provide wine lovers with yet another layer of discovery.

Over one third of our cellar doors offer local produce as part of the tasting experience - from high-end, starred restaurants to casual platters - there is a wine and food combination to suit any taste.

Our region's 30 kilometres of breath-taking coastline and ranges define McLaren Vale's boundaries, and the distinct landscapes and environment within.

McLaren Vale's collaborative and generous nature, unique combination of world class wines and produce - both on the farm and on the plate - with a beach lifestyle, ensures that our region truly offers a unique, welcoming experience.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Grape Variety Shiraz 100% Colour Bright crimson with a fuchsia rim. Bouquet Blackberry, plum and raspberry alongside black pepper and a hint of biscuity oak. Palate Ripe red fruits combine with plush tannins for an exceptionally approachable texture and a rich, mouth-filling quality. Drink For immediate enjoyment and over the next five years. Food Match Spaghetti meatballs in a tomato and basil sauce, served with parmesan.

Vinification: Fruit was gently crushed and de-stemmed prior to commencing fermentation where fermentation temperatures were kept at 20-22ºC, rising to 25-28ºC at peak of ferment. Generally, ferments were pumped over two to four times daily to assist in sufficient flavour and colour extraction, as well as to monitor and control fermentation temperature. Nearing completion and having achieved the desired flavour and tannin extraction, pumpovers were reduced to once or twice daily to keep the cap (skins and seeds) moist. At approximately 1-2°Baume, the juice from the fermenter was drained, and the remaining skins were pressed via tank or basket press. Wines completed malolactic fermentation in tank or barrel as individual vineyard parcels and matured in oak before blending.

Planted in 1972, the Scrubby Rise vineyards at Wirra Wirra sit on ancient rocks more than 100,000 years old. The fact that they are totally flat and contain no “scrub” or bush whatsoever was of more interest to the late Greg Trott, who gave them their dubious name. As one might call a redhead “Bluey” or a tall man “Shorty”, Trott drew on traditional Aussie humour to make the point that we shouldn’t take life too seriously. Be dedicated to your task he said, but everything else should be fun. That’s a philosophy we aspire to at Wirra Wirra, as we raise a glass of this classic McLaren Vale shiraz.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Wirra Wirra

The ironstone cellars of Wirra Wirra house a history rich in mischief, adventure and dedication to creating great wines.  The winery was built in 1894 by an eccentric former state cricketer, who absconded to McLaren Vale after embarrassing his family one too many times. 

It was re-built in the late 1960's by a visionary who dreamt of returning Wirra Wirra to its former glory. Greg Trott did more than that, he created a legacy of being dedicated to your craft while being equally serious about having fun and enjoying life.    

 

 

--------THE REGION--------

McLaren Vale

Only 45 minutes south of Adelaide in South Australia, McLaren Vale is home to sustainable winegrowing, world-class wines and culinary experiences, as well as pristine natural attractions and unparalleled tourism offerings.

South Australia's viticultural origins began in McLaren Vale and our region's Mediterranean climate continues to drive our region's wine style and diverse food culture.

Best known for Shiraz, McLaren Vale also excels in the production of ultra-premium Grenache and Cabernet. Spanish and Italian varieties such as Fiano, Vermentino, Tempranillo and Sangiovese are also very well suited climatically and provide wine lovers with yet another layer of discovery.

Over one third of our cellar doors offer local produce as part of the tasting experience - from high-end, starred restaurants to casual platters - there is a wine and food combination to suit any taste.

Our region's 30 kilometres of breath-taking coastline and ranges define McLaren Vale's boundaries, and the distinct landscapes and environment within.

McLaren Vale's collaborative and generous nature, unique combination of world class wines and produce - both on the farm and on the plate - with a beach lifestyle, ensures that our region truly offers a unique, welcoming experience.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.